Revenue Streams for Urban Indian Organizations

Authors: Isaiah O'Rear and Alexandra Payan

Publication Year: 2024

Last Updated: May 31, 2024

Keywords: Covid-19, Federal Health Care, Medicaid, Finance

 

Short Abstract: During the height of the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE), Congress passed a series of bipartisan relief bills that provided UIOs with additional monetary support.

 

Abstract: During the height of the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE), Congress passed a series of bipartisan relief bills that provided UIOs with additional monetary support. These funding increases from COVID-19 relief allowed UIOs to advance existing programs, invest in infrastructure needs, establish mobile clinics, expand dental health care, hire more staff, and engage in additional outreach efforts. Despite the supplemental funding increases, UIOs remain chronically underfunded, still falling short of meeting the one-year funding amount needed and requested by the National Tribal Budget Formulation Workgroup.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/UIO-Survey-C19-Report-NCUIH-D494_F.pdf

Type of Resource: NCUIH data products

 

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Understanding Disabilities in American Indian & Alaska Native Communities Toolkit Guide

Authors: National Indian Council on Aging, Inc. and National Council on Disability

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated:

Journal:

Keywords: Aging; Awareness; Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Diabetes; Health Care Access; Health Disparities; Medicare; Medicaid; Mental and Behavioral Health; Population Information; Substance Use; Visual Impairment; Disability; Historical Trauma

 

Short Abstract: This resource is divided into dedicated sections for healthy living, education, independent living, vocational rehabilitation and employment resources, assistive technology, housing and facilities, and transportation.

 

Abstract: This resource is divided into dedicated sections for healthy living, education, independent living, vocational rehabilitation and employment resources, assistive technology, housing and facilities, and transportation. Additional information provides overviews on federal disabilities laws, initiatives, agencies, and organizations that support work with Native individuals with disabilities and communities.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

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Source: https://www.nicoa.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/03/NCD_Understanding_Disabilities_in_American_Indian_508.pdf

Type of Resource: Toolkit

American Indian and Alaska Native children experience high rates of RSV-related hospitalizations

Authors: Joshua Fitch, Editor

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: Jul 24, 2023

Journal:

Keywords: Ethnicity; Health Disparities; Infant Mortality; Minority Groups; Population Information; Race; Social Determinants of Health; Vaccination/Immunization; Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-associated acute respiratory infection (ARI) hospitalizations; RSV; ARI; Hospitalizations

 

Short Abstract: Results from this active, facility-based surveillance study revealed hospitalization rates for children younger than 5 years were 1.7 to 7.1 times higher among American Indian and Alaska Native children compared to estimates from the methodologically similar US New Vaccine Surveillance Network (NVSN). ---- No abstract it is an article.

 

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Source: Link to Original Article.

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Type of Resource: Other

Perspectives of Indigenous University Students in Canada on Mindfulness-Based Interventions and their Adaptation to Reduce Depression and Anxiety Symptoms

Authors: Shadi Beshai, Sharon M. Desjarlais & Brenda Green

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: February 21, 2023

Journal: Mindfulness

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Health Disparities; Mental and Behavioral Health; Psychology Suicide and Suicide Prevention; Youth; Anxiety; Depression; Mindfulness

 

Short Abstract: Objectives Indigenous university students experience high rates of anxiety and depression due primarily to the pernicious and persistent effects of colonialism, racism, and discrimination. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) hold promise, but likely require adaptation to make them culturally relevant for Indigenous peoples. We sought to gather Indigenous students’ perspectives on the consistency and adaptability of MBIs for Indigenous students experiencing symptoms of depression and anxiety.

 

Abstract: Objectives Indigenous university students experience high rates of anxiety and depression due primarily to the pernicious and persistent effects of colonialism, racism, and discrimination. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) hold promise, but likely require adaptation to make them culturally relevant for Indigenous peoples. We sought to gather Indigenous students’ perspectives on the consistency and adaptability of MBIs for Indigenous students experiencing symptoms of depression and anxiety. Method This three-part longitudinal investigation employed a qualitative design mixed with Indigenous research methods to elicit feedback from students (n = 14; Mage = 28.92) on the acceptability of MBIs and ways to tailor MBIs to make them more consistent with Indigenous cultures and student lifestyles. We subsequently used this feedback to develop an outline for an adapted MBI that was then re-evaluated by the same participants for its cultural relevance and safety. Results Indigenous students emphasized the need for the adapted MBI to incorporate (a) traditional Indigenous practices; (b) Indigenous facilitators; (c) holistic conceptualizations of mental health that include spirituality; and (d) practices and methods that could improve flexibility and accessibility of the adapted intervention. Based on this feedback, we presented students with an outline of an adapted MBI tentatively titled Miyowâyâwin Mindful Wellbeing Program, which received favorable evaluations by students for cultural consistency and safety. Conclusions We confirmed the perceived acceptability and consistency of mindfulness and mindfulness programs with Indigenous cultures. The need for a flexible MBI that centers Indigenous elements and Indigenous facilitators was highlighted by Indigenous participants. This study paves the way for latter steps of the development and subsequent evaluation of the Miyowâyâwin Mindful Wellbeing Program.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

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Source: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12671-023-02087-7

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Determinants of Lung Cancer Screening in a Minnesota Urban Indigenous Community: A Community-Based, Participatory, Action-Oriented Study

Authors: Madison D. Anderson, Wyatt J. Pickner, Abbie Begnaud

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated:

Journal: Cancer Prevention Research

Keywords: Cancer; Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Health Disparities

 

Short Abstract: Although lung cancer screening (LCS) with annual low-dose chest CT has been shown to reduce lung cancer deaths, it remains underutilized. Northern Plains American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities experience extreme lung cancer disparities, and little is known about the acceptance and adoption of LCS in these groups.

 

Abstract: Although lung cancer screening (LCS) with annual low-dose chest CT has been shown to reduce lung cancer deaths, it remains underutilized. Northern Plains American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities experience extreme lung cancer disparities, and little is known about the acceptance and adoption of LCS in these groups. We conducted interviews with healthcare professionals and focus groups with patients in an urban Minnesota community clinic serving AI/AN. Data collection took place during winter 2019–2020. Indigenous researchers collected and analyzed the data for emergent themes using simultaneous collaborative consensus with a LCS researcher. Participants reported some similar barriers to LCS as previous studies reported but also shared some new insights into traditional ways of knowing and recommendations for effectively implementing this evidence-based preventive care service. Lung screening is largely acceptable to patients and healthcare personnel in an AI/AN–serving community clinic. We identified barriers as previously reported in other populations but also identified some unique barriers and motivators. For example, the concept of the seven generations may provide motivation to maintain one's health for future generations while providing additional support during screening for persons traumatized by the Western medicine health system may facilitate increased screening uptake. Prevention Relevance: Secondary prevention of lung cancer through screening is potentially lifesaving considering that overall survival of lung cancer is 20% at 5 years but curable if detected at an early stage. This work provides insight into culturally tailored approaches to implementing the service in individuals at high risk of the disease.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

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Source: https://aacrjournals.org/cancerpreventionresearch/article/16/4/239/718841/Determinants-of-Lung-Cancer-Screening-in-a

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Promoting Ethical Research With American Indian and Alaska Native People Living in Urban Areas

Authors: Nicole P. Yuan, Jami Bartgis, and Deirdre Demers

Publication Year: 2014

Last Updated:

Journal: American Journal of Public Health

Keywords: Data Collection; Health Disparities; Ethical Research

 

Short Abstract: Most health research with American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) people has focused on tribal communities on reservation lands. Few studies have been conducted with AI/AN people living in urban settings despite their documented health disparities compared with other urban populations.

 

Abstract: Most health research with American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) people has focused on tribal communities on reservation lands. Few studies have been conducted with AI/AN people living in urban settings despite their documented health disparities compared with other urban populations. There are unique considerations for working with this population. Engaging key stakeholders, including urban Indian health organization leaders, tribal leaders, research scientists and administrators, and policymakers, is critical to promoting ethical research and enhancing capacity of urban AI/AN communities. Recommendations for their involvement may facilitate an open dialogue and promote the development of implementation strategies. Future collaborations are also necessary for establishing research policies aimed at improving the health of the urban AI/AN population.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

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Source: https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/pdf/10.2105/AJPH.2014.302027?role=tab

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Responsible Research With Urban American Indians and Alaska Natives

Authors: Rosalina D. James et al.

Publication Year: 2018

Last Updated:

Journal: American Journal of Public Health

Keywords: Data Collection; Mistrust

 

Short Abstract: American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities harbor understandable mistrust of research. Outside researchers have historically controlled processes, promulgating conclusions and recommended policies with virtually no input from the communities studied.

 

Abstract: American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities harbor understandable mistrust of research. Outside researchers have historically controlled processes, promulgating conclusions and recommended policies with virtually no input from the communities studied. Reservation-based communities can apply sovereignty rights conferred by the federal government to change this research trajectory. Many tribes now require review and approval before allowing research activities to occur, in part through the development of regulatory codes and oversight measures. Tribal oversight ensures that research is directed toward questions of importance to the community and that results are returned in ways that optimize problem solving. Unfortunately, tribal governance protections do not always extend to AI/ANs residing in urban environments. Although they represent the majority of AI/ANs, urban Indians face an ongoing struggle for visibility and access to health care. It is against this backdrop that urban Indians suffer disproportionate health problems. Improved efforts to ensure responsible research with urban Indian populations requires attention to community engagement, research oversight, and capacity building. We consider strategies to offset these limitations and develop a foundation for responsible research with urban Indians.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

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Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6236730/pdf/AJPH.2018.304708.pdf

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Indigenous Evaluation Toolkit: An Actionable Guide for Organizations Serving American Indian / Alaska Native Communities through Opioid Prevention Programming

Authors: Seven Directions: A Center for Indigenous Public Health

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated:

Journal:

Keywords: Awareness; Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Data Collection; Ethnicity; Mental and Behavioral Health; Race; Substance Use; Data Collection; Research Methodology; Toolkit

 

Short Abstract: Indigenous communities have always engaged in review and reflection. Western research and evaluation frameworks may not align with ancestral and cultural wisdom, and we hope to address this through our Indigenous Evaluation Toolkit.

 

Abstract: Indigenous communities have always engaged in review and reflection. Western research and evaluation frameworks may not align with ancestral and cultural wisdom, and we hope to address this through our Indigenous Evaluation Toolkit. As Indigenous communities continue to shape programming to reflect their own stories, ways of knowing, and cultural perspectives, there is a growing need for frameworks that support the infusion of this knowledge into the evaluation of their programs focused on substance use prevention, treatment, and recovery support. Through step-by-step guidance, worksheets, and storytelling, this toolkit offers communities an iterative, reflective, continuous learning process for beginning or incorporating Indigenous evaluation.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

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Source: https://www.indigenousphi.org/tribal-opioid-use-disorders-prevention/indigenous-evaluation-toolkit

Type of Resource: Toolkit

Standards of Care in Diabetes—2023 Abridged for Primary Care Providers

Authors: American Diabetes Association

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: February 16, 2023

Journal: American Diabetes Association

Keywords: Awareness; Diabetes; General Materials; Health Disparities; Health Care Reform; NCUIH Newsletters; Social Determinants of Health

 

Short Abstract: This abridged version of the current Standards of Care contains the evidence-based recommendations most pertinent to primary care. The recommendations, tables, and figures included here retain the same numbering used in the complete Standards of Care.

 

Abstract: This abridged version of the current Standards of Care contains the evidence-based recommendations most pertinent to primary care. The recommendations, tables, and figures included here retain the same numbering used in the complete Standards of Care. All recommendations included here are substantively the same as in the complete Standards of Care. The abridged version does not include references. The complete 2023 Standards of Care, including all supporting references, is available at professional. diabetes.org/standards.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

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Source: https://diabetesjournals.org/clinical/article/doi/10.2337/cd23-er02a/148453/Erratum-Standards-of-Care-in-Diabetes-2023

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

The Three Sisters Garden: A Cultural Approach to Cultivating American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) Psychological Service Providers.

Authors: Gray, J. S., Wheeler, M. J., & Bender, N. M.

Publication Year: 2021

Journal: American Psychological Association

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Health Disparities; Psychology; Social Determinants of Health

 

Short Abstract: With the current emphasis on diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in education and psychological services, it is important to understand the culturally important issues for American Indian/Alaska Native students training of psychological services providers.

 

Abstract: With the current emphasis on diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in education and psychological services, it is important to understand the culturally important issues for American Indian/Alaska Native students training of psychological services providers. The Three Sisters Model can provide the necessary guidance and supports to provide the important DEI aspects for the development of culturally sensitive and humble psychological service providers while retaining AI/AN ones.

 

Source: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2022-53783-001

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

 

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