Photo-Based Evaluation: A Method for Participatory Evaluation With Adolescents

Authors: Deinera Exner-Cortens, Kathleen C. Sitter, Marisa Van Bavel, Alysia Wright

Publication Year: 2021

Last Updated: February 5, 2021

Journal: American Journal of Evaluation

Keywords: Awareness; Development; Gender Identity; Information Technologies; Social Determinants of Health; Health Promotion; Youth; Evaluation; Engagement; Gender; Healthy Relationships; WiseGuyz

 

Short Abstract: Actively engaging adolescents in meaningful program evaluation is a topic of growing interest. One possibility for such engagement is the use of photographs as part of visual evaluation, so that youth can directly engage with the research process. In this Method Note, we describe the development and implementation of a participatory, photo-based evaluation method for youth health promotion/prevention programs.

 

Abstract: Actively engaging adolescents in meaningful program evaluation is a topic of growing interest. One possibility for such engagement is the use of photographs as part of visual evaluation, so that youth can directly engage with the research process. In this Method Note, we describe the development and implementation of a participatory, photo-based evaluation method for youth health promotion/prevention programs. Youth in this study were participants in a gender-transformative healthy relationships program for boys. We present literature supporting the use of photographs as a visual research method and for involving youth as active participants in evaluation, and explore the feasibility, utility, and acceptability of this innovative application of existing methods based on researcher experience and youth feedback. We conclude with implications for photo-based evaluation of health promotion/prevention programs, highlighting the promise of this method for promoting critical youth engagement in the evaluation and creating meaningful knowledge translation tools. Photo-based evaluation could be a useful methodology for engaging AI/AN youth in research. More active engagement in the research process as well as having more control over the information the individual shares may help to alleviate some of the risks that are associated with being involved in research studies for AI/AN communities. Previous research mentioned in the article showed positive results when photo-voice was used with urban First Nations youth. (https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/24694193.2016.1273977).

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Funding:

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Source: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1098214020927785

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Making Amends: Recommended Strategies and Actions to Improve the Health and Safety of American Indian and Alaska Native Mothers and Infants

Authors: U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Advisory Committee on Infant and Maternal Mortality (ACIMM)

Publication Year: 2022

Last Updated: December 2022

Journal:

Keywords: Awareness; Ethnicity; Federal Health Care; Health Care Access; Health Disparities; IHS; Infant Mortality; Medicare; Medicaid; Minority Groups; Misclassification of AI/AN; Pregnancy; Women's Health; Social Determinants of Health

 

Short Abstract: Report submitted in to US HHS Secretary with recommendations for the federal government to reconcile past actions and step up to the obligations to American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN). Recommendations are based on the findings of previous reports on the health of AI/AN people, populations, and communities, ACIMM’s analysis of maternal health and birth outcome-related data, presentations by representatives of federal health programs, and the testimony and input of over 88 individuals with relevant lived and professional experience.

 

Abstract: Report submitted in to US HHS Secretary with recommendations for the federal government to reconcile past actions and step up to the obligations to American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN). Recommendations are based on the findings of previous reports on the health of AI/AN people, populations, and communities, ACIMM’s analysis of maternal health and birth outcome-related data, presentations by representatives of federal health programs, and the testimony and input of over 88 individuals with relevant lived and professional experience. 59 strategies are offered to support three overarching recommendations: I. Make the health and safety of AI/AN mothers and infants a priority for action. II. Improve the living conditions of AI/AN mothers and infants and assure universal access to high quality healthcare III. Address urgent and immediate challenges that disproportionately affect AI/AN women before, during, and after pregnancy.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

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Source: https://www.hrsa.gov/sites/default/files/hrsa/advisory-committees/infant-mortality/birth-outcomes-AI-AN-mothers-infants.pdf

Type of Resource: Report

Prevention in Our Native Communities Vol 3 Issue 1 Fall 2022

Authors: National American Indian and Alaska Native Prevention technology transfer center (PTTC) network

Publication Year: 2022

Last Updated: November 5, 2022

Keywords: Minority Groups; Suicide and Suicide Prevention; Social Determinants of Health

 

Short Abstract: This issue focuses on the negative impact stigma has on Natives in the early phases of the development of a substance use disorder. People in this situation could profit from early intervention but may feel embarrassed because of the stigma associated with substance use/abuse. The main article describes ways to ensure that culturally appropriate prevention efforts are both trauma-informed and non-stigmatizing.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://pttcnetwork.org/centers/national-american-indian-alaska-native-pttc/product/prevention-our-native-communities-vol-3

Type of Resource: Best Practices Newsletter

Keeping Us Whole: Preventing Missing and Murdered Indigenous People – Podcast Series

Authors: US Dept. of Health and Human Services: Administration for Native Americans

Publication Year: 2022

Last Updated: April 26, 2022

Keywords: Awareness; Childcare; Injury and Trauma; NCUIH Newsletters; Population Information; Violence

 

Short Abstract: For generations, American Indian, Alaskan Native and Native Hawaiian peoples have faced an ongoing crisis of violence, human trafficking, and an epidemic of Missing and Murdered Indigenous People (also known as MMIP). To bolster prevention efforts to mitigate the MMIP epidemic, the Administration for Native Americans (ANA), a program office within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), collaborated with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary’s Interdepartmental Council on Native American Affairs (ICNAA) to develop a podcast series to raise awareness, provide prevention resources and educate listeners on MMIP.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ana/podcast/keeping-us-whole-preventing-missing-and-murdered-indigenous-people-podcast-series

Type of Resource: Podcast Series

A Community-Based Evaluation of a Culturally Grounded, American Indian After-School Prevention Program: The Value of Practitioner-Researcher Collaboration

Authors: Brooke de Heer, Jade Heffern, Julianna Cheney, Aaron Secakuku, Julie Baldwin

Publication Year: 2020

Last Updated: September 2020

Journal: American Indian and Alaskan Native Mental Health Research

Keywords: Childcare; Mental and Behavioral Health

 

Short Abstract: Programs serving American Indian (AI) youth are an important component of maintaining cultural identity and healthy lifestyles. The current research took a community-engaged approach to evaluate an urban AI youth after-school program that has transitioned into a culturally grounded prevention program. Ways to create a successful research collaboration between AI communities and academics is discussed as well as implications for understanding the importance of culturally-grounded programs for AI youth who reside in urban areas. Overall, the cultural and health components that are integrated into the after-school program were highlighted as primary strengths because they help foster a healthy lifestyle and deeper connection to the heritage/culture for the youth who participated.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Loved Here, Safe Here, Social Marketing Campaign

Authors: Author: Adolescent Health Team at the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board (NPAIHB)

Publication Year: 2022

Last Updated:

Keywords: Awareness; Childcare; Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Development; Minority Groups; Sexuality; LGBTQ/2S

 

Short Abstract: Due to STI Awareness Week being April 10-16, 2022, the Adolescent Health Team at the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board (NPAIHB) has created a resource guide filled with health promotion materials for tribal clinics. This guide is also meant to be a source for those who work with Native Youth, to support them in creating a safe space for the 2SLGBTQ+ community. Hence the name, "Love Here, Safe Here," a collaboration with AI/AN LGBTQ and Two Spirit community members. All resource materials are attached in the folder provided.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://www.npaihb.org/social-marketing-campaigns/