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NCUIH Youth Council Member Faith Bowman – Reminder of the Indigi-Wellness Champion Campaign

Koolamaski/ Hello my name is Faith Bowman. I am from the Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Nation in Wisconsin and I am a member of the Inaugural Youth Council for the National Council of Urban Indian Health.

I just want to thank all who participated in the first NCUIH Youth Convening! We really appreciate your support and willingness to learn about the NCUIH Youth Council and our Indigi-Wellness Champion Campaign.

Speaking of the Indigi-Wellness Champion Campaign, we want to remind you save the date for our campaign launch on September 10th.

The Indigi-Wellness Champion Campaign is aimed at promoting overall health of Native Youth across Indian country by challenging YOU to challenge yourself and peers to embody an Indigi-Wellness Champion.

If this is you or someone you know, get involved by posting on social media showing how you stay resilient in your community and how you embody an Indigenous Wellness Champion. Be sure to Include the following hashtags (#ThisIsNative #CultureIsPrevention #NCUIH #NCUIHYC18) and our two-braid logos and you are one step closer to winning some awesome prizes and bundles.

How do you get involved? It’s very easy.

  • Create a Social Media post showing you using your culture/hobbies or pics of Friends and Family that promotes wellness and resiliency. Putting your settings as Public will allow NCUIH to view your submission.
  • Answer (2) simple questions:
    • “What does it mean to be an Indigi-Wellness Champion?”
    • “How do you stay resilient in your community?”
  • Challenge other Native Youth to join in the movement and share what makes them resilient.
  • Use the YC two-braid image on social media posts
  • Submit you your Social Media Post link here https://www.ncuih.org/indigiwellness at NCUIH’s National Headquarters on or before 11:59 PM September 20, 2019 and submit.

So I ask you how do you stay resilient in your community?

If you are looking be a part of this national network and learn how to become an Indigi-Wellness Champion National Social Contest and Campaign that launches on September 10th. To learn more about how you can build a support system or how to be more supportive, follow our campaign from September 10-20, 2019 and press on the link below https://www.ncuih.org/indigiwellness

We hope to see you on September 10th for our Campaign Launch!

Anushiik (Thank you)!

What does it mean for be an Indigi-Wellness Champion? Peer-to-Peer Support

My name is Shoshanna “Mah-Gah-Wah-See” Johnson and I’m a member of the Big Jim Band from the Absentee-Shawnee Tribe of Oklahoma. Throughout my time on the Inaugural Youth Advisory Council, I’ve learned a lot about the importance of peer-to-peer support. Most of my friends and family members know that I work in suicide prevention so I’m very open to talking about mental health. It’s created a safe space for some of my friends to come to me for support whether it’s just being an open ear or helping them find resources specific to their needs. I’ve learned that it’s important for youth to know that being resilient does not mean that you still won’t face times in your life when you will have to deal with stress.

If someone you know is thinking about suicide, help them connect to resources. Help them build a support system so that they have others to reach out to for help, whether it’s 1-800-273- TALK (8255), family, friends, teachers, coaches or a counselor. Listen to their reasons for feeling hopeless and in pain. Listen without judgment and with compassion and empathy.

As Indigenous people, we owe it to our ancestors to come and work together because that intertribal connectedness is medicine in this day in age. That’s how our traditions will stay alive and how our people can stay resilient. This is what it means for me to be an Indigi-Wellness Warrior. If you are looking be a part of this national network and learn how to become an Indigi-Wellness Champion National Social Contest and Campaign that launches on September 10th. How do you get involved? It’s very easy.

      1. Create a post and share photos of life, family, friends, hobbies as examples of ways you keep your Indigenous identity strong and what have you been doing to promote health and wellness in your community over the past 4 years.
      2. Answer 2 questions in your post: “What does it mean to be an Indigi-Wellness Champion?” and “How do you stay resilient in your community”?
      3. Ask other Native youth to join the movement in your post and ask them “What does it mean for you to be an Indigi-Wellness Champion?” and “How do you stay resilient in your community”?
      4. Share on Facebook, Twitter and/or Instagram. Make sure that your social media post settings are public for NCUIH’s office to view your submission.
        • *Always get parental permission before posting any content online (if under 18 years old)
        • Include the Youth Council Campaign Logo & hashtags #ThisIsNative #CultureIsPrevention #NCUIH #NCUIHYC18
        • Create your post by using the YC’s two braided image representing both campaigns to be provided soon.
      5. Submit your post at https://www.ncuih.org/indigiwellness before 11:59 PM September 20, 2019.

So I ask you how do you stay resilient in your community”?

Ne ah way!

NCUIH Youth Council: Meet Czarina Campos

Halito!

My name is Czarina Campos, and I am a member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. I graduated from Arizona State University, and now work with the Indian Health Service. I have been an Urban American Indian my whole life, and super excited to be a part of the National Council of Urban Indian Health’s Youth Council for 2019-2020. I am looking forward to collaborating with the inaugural youth council on their campaign, as well as working with this year’s council members to continue helping other AI/AN youth.

I hope that by being on this council, I can show others how important it is to create and maintain a native network with friends, mentors and role-models, and staying connecting. It was hard for me to fully appreciate my culture being an urban Native American, and always being far away from my extended family back in Oklahoma, but then I see what my fellow native peers are accomplishing and their achievements inspire me to continue to give back and help future generations, and to become a role model for AI/AN communities.

With that being said, I want to encourage all AI/AN youth to attend the Inaugural Youth Council’s first event – a Native Youth Convening. This convening will introduce campaigns that were designed by native youth, and most importantly teach native youth on how to become an Indigi-Wellness Champion. Please sign-up at https://www.ncuih.org/youth-convening and join us on Tuesday, August 6th, 2019 from 3:00 PM- 5:00PM EST.

Yakoke!

NCUIH Youth Council: Meet Adon Vazquez

I am an enrolled member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians from North Carolina. I am a sophomore at Wayne State University and I have strong commitment when comes to supporting native youth. I am a peer mentor at American Indian Health and Family Services of Southeastern Michigan (AIHFS). I’m very grateful to be a part of the inaugural youth council for the National Council of Urban Indian Health.

What is the NCUIH Youth Council? We are a council dedicated to reducing substance abuse and suicidal burden among Native youth by building a global network in which American Indian and Alaska Native youth can share and exchange ideas, knowledge, resources, and support services. Basically, we want to help Urban and Tribal Native youth in their cultural, spiritual, and physical health journeys by providing resources and helping to develop resiliency tactics.

Our first major event as a council is our Youth Convening. Here, we will introduce you our 2 hashtag campaigns we have coming up. These campaigns are designed BY Native youth FOR Native youth. They are aimed to help build a national network of support while simultaneously showing Native youth that you are not alone, our culture is the armor that protects us, and to embrace your indigeneity.

If you are looking be a part of this national network and learn how to be become an Indigi-Wellness Champion – Join us this Tuesday, August 6th, 2019 from 3:00 PM- 5:00PM EST for our Virtual Native Youth Convening.

Register here → https://www.ncuih.org/Youth-Convening

So I ask…. How do you stay resilient?

NCUIH Youth Council: Meet Benjamin Sandecki

Osiyo, my name is Benjamin Sandecki and I am a tribal member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma. It is an honor thus far to serve on the 2019 National Council of Urban Indian Health Youth Council.

I am currently pursuing a doctorate degree in pharmacy at Southwestern Oklahoma State University College of Pharmacy. Throughout my pharmacy career, I have been privileged to intern at the Oklahoma City Urban Indian Clinic where my experience has directly allowed me to appreciate the importance of Native American health and wellness.

I joined the 2019 NCUIH Youth Council with aspirations to establish the necessary skills to increase awareness of suicide prevention, combat substance abuse, and promote healthy lifestyle routines for Native American youth and young adults living in urban settings. The Youth Council and social marketing campaign grants me the opportunity to advocate for Native issues while forging techniques to create resiliency among the Native American youth population.

To join the national social marketing campaign and learn what it takes to become an Idigi-Youth Champion, please join me and my colleagues for our National Virtual Native Youth Convening on Tuesday, August 6th, 2019 from 3:00 PM – 5:00 PM EST.

NCUIH Youth Council: Meet Lala Forrest

I am an enrolled member of the Pit River Tribe located in Northern California. Growing up in a rural area but, pursuing higher education in an urban setting, I see firsthand how social inequalities exist and continue to persist for Native American youth.

I joined the Youth Council because I saw it as an opportunity to educate the public on urban Native American issues ranging from social welfare to health ailments. The NCUIH Youth Council understands that urban Native American youth encounter unique barriers as they strive to find a balance between their indigenous roots and Western living. We also know that Native tribal youth living on reservations also have unique barriers.

It is our hope that the Youth Council can be a source of support, and can empower both urban and tribal Native American youth to persevere and see their goals come to fruition. Thus, we created a national social media campaign under the hashtags “Culture is Prevention” and “This is Native” to raise awareness and disseminate culturally-tailored resources for both urban and tribal Native American youth on suicide and substance misuse.

If you are looking to connect to tools and resources that help you overcome social and health barriers, learn how to become an Indigi-Youth Champion and much more, please attend our National Virtual Native Youth Convening Pre-Launch Campaign.

The Virtual Native Youth Convening will occur on Tuesday, August 6th, 2019 from 3:00 PM- 5:00PM EST.\

Register

NCUIH Youth Council: Meet Faith Bowman

Koolamaski/ Hello my name is Faith Bowman. I am from the Stockbridge-Munsee Band of Mohican Nation in Wisconsin and I am a member of the Inaugural Youth Council for the National Council of Urban Indian Health.

What is the NCUIH Youth Council? We are council dedicated to reducing substance abuse and suicidal burden among Native youth by building a global network in which American Indian and Alaska Native youth can share and exchange ideas, knowledge, resources, and support services. Basically, we want to help Urban Native youth in their cultural, spiritual, and physical health journeys by providing resources and helping to develop resiliency tactics.

Our first major event as a council is our Youth Convening. Here, we will introduce you to some of the campaigns we have coming up. These campaigns are designed BY Native youth FOR Native youth. They are aimed to help build a national network of support while simultaneously showing Native youth that you are not alone, our culture is the armor that protects us, and to embrace your indigeneity.

If you are looking to hear how you can be a part of this national network, join us on August 6 from 3pm – 5pm. Sign up at https://www.ncuih.org/youth-convening.

Anushiik (Thank you)!

Register