KRC Articles

Adaptation of a Smoking Cessation and Prevention Website for Urban American Indian/Alaska Native Youth

Authors: Maile Taualii

Publication Year: 2010

Last Updated:

Journal: Journal of Cancer Education

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Tobacco Use (non-traditional); Youth; eHealth Intervention

 

Short Abstract: Tobacco use among American Indian youth is a disproportionately significant problem. We adapted and modified an existing web-based and youth-focused tobacco control program to make it appropriate for young urban American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs).

 

Abstract: Tobacco use among American Indian youth is a disproportionately significant problem. We adapted and modified an existing web-based and youth-focused tobacco control program to make it appropriate for young urban American Indian/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs). The results of the focus group indicate that AI/AN youth were very receptive to the use of a web-based Zine-style intervention tool. They wanted the look and feel of the website to be more oriented toward their cultural images. Future research should examine if successful programs for reducing non-ceremonial tobacco use among urban AI/AN youth can keep young irregular smokers from becoming adult smokers.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

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Source: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13187-009-0004-2

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Food Insecurity, Sleep, and Cardiometabolic Risks in Urban American Indian/Alaska Native Youth

Authors: Lu Dong et al.

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated:

Journal: Sleep Health

Keywords: Health Disparities; Nutrition; Weight Management and Obesity; Adolescents; Food Insecurity; Sleep

 

Short Abstract: Objectives: Food insecurity contributes to racial/ethnic disparities in health. This is the first study to examine associations among food insecurity, sleep, and cardiometabolic outcomes in urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth.

 

Abstract: Objectives: Food insecurity contributes to racial/ethnic disparities in health. This is the first study to examine associations among food insecurity, sleep, and cardiometabolic outcomes in urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) youth. Design: Participants were 142 urban AI/AN youth (mean age = 14 years, 58% female). Food insecurity and self-reported sleep disturbance were measured using validated surveys. A multi-dimensional sleep health composite was derived using questionnaires (ie, satisfaction, alertness) and actigraphy-derived indices (ie, duration, efficiency, regularity, timing). Cardiometabolic measures included body mass index, blood pressure, glycosylated hemoglobin, waist circumference, cholesterol, and triglycerides. Covariates were sex, age, and single-parent household. Results: Greater food insecurity was significantly associated with greater body mass index (b = 0.12, p = .015), higher systolic blood pressure (b = 0.93, p = .03), and greater sleep disturbance (b = 1.49, p < .001), and marginally associated with lower sleep health composite scores (b = -0.09, p = .08). There was a significant indirect path from greater food insecurity to greater waist circumference through poorer sleep health (0.11, 95% bootstrapping CI: [0.01, 0.30]). Conclusion: Food insecurity is an important correlate of sleep and cardiometabolic health among urban AI/AN youth and should be addressed to reduce emerging health risks during this important developmental period. Policies to reduce food insecurity and increase access to healthy foods as well as sleep interventions for these youth could help, as preliminary findings suggest that sleep health may mediate the negative impact of food insecurity on cardiometabolic risks.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

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Source: https://reader.elsevier.com/reader/sd/pii/S235272182200184X?token=D0AFE479963D406B2D8C578BD1D0B286F2B4FFF59CE871829F638E0249B1CB336BE10B8CEA257BA010E8AD6456D89D4B&originRegion=us-east-1&originCreation=20230317145114

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Understanding Sleep Facilitators, Barriers, and Cultural Dimensions in Native American Urban Youth

Authors: Alina Palimaru, PhD, MPP, Ryan Brown, PhD MA, Wendy Troxel, PhD MS, Daniel Dickerson, DO MPH, Carrie Johnson, PhD, Elizabeth D'Amico, PhD MA

Publication Year: 2020

Last Updated: August 2020

Journal: Sleep Health

Keywords: Childcare; Health Disparities; Mental and Behavioral Health; Sleep Health

 

Short Abstract: Background: AI/AN youth are a high-risk group for sleep problems and associated conditions. AI/AN youth are a high-risk group for sleep problems and associated chronic conditions. Urban AI/AN youth may face certain challenges, including specific psychosocial stressors (e.g., discrimination) and environmental factors (e.g., noise, light) that render them particularly vulnerable to poor sleep health. However, few studies have explored AI/AN adolescent sleep.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7529658/

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

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