KRC Articles

Understanding and Healing Historical Trauma: The Perspectives of Native American Elders

Authors: Lisa Grayshield, Jeremy J. Rutherford, Sibella B. Salazar, et al.

Publication Year: 2015

Journal: Journal of Mental Health Counseling

Keywords: Injury and Trauma; Mental and Behavioral Health; healing; wellness; elders

 

Short Abstract: In this phenomenological study 11 Native American elders addressed three research questions: (a) the effect of historical trauma on self, family, and community; (h) how historical trauma currently affects Native people and their communities; and (c) what they would recommend that counselors and therapists do in addressing issues of historical trauma for Native and tribal people.

 

Abstract: In this phenomenological study 11 Native American elders addressed three research questions: (a) the effect of historical trauma on self, family, and community; (h) how historical trauma currently affects Native people and their communities; and (c) what they would recommend that counselors and therapists do in addressing issues of historical trauma for Native and tribal people. All participants spoke of historical trauma in terms of loss of tribal language and culture. They seemed to speak directly to Native people themselves as having the answers to healing and wellness for their own people; however, recommendations for nontribal people who work with Native people and communities were discussed.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/Understanding-and-Healing-2015-one-pager-formated.pdf

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

 

One Pager:

Crystallizing the Role of Traditional Healing in an Urban Native American Health Center

Authors: Jacquelene F. Moghaddam, Sandra L. Momper, Timothy W. Fong

Publication Year: 2015

Journal: Community Mental Health Journal

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Data Collection

 

Short Abstract: A needs assessment surveying American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs) at an AI/AN health center in the Midwestern United States was conducted, with an emphasis on traditional Native healing. Data from this study included qualitative material from interviews of community members (N = 27; age 12–82) and service providers (N = 11; age 26–70).

 

Abstract: A needs assessment surveying American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs) at an AI/AN health center in the Midwestern United States was conducted, with an emphasis on traditional Native healing. Data from this study included qualitative material from interviews of community members (N = 27; age 12–82) and service providers (N = 11; age 26–70). Respondents emphasized the path to wellness includes physical, spiritual and mental health and that traditional healing can restore various imbalances. Furthermore, traditional healing was considered a complement to Western medicine. Third, traditional medicine as a tool in healthcare settings was conceptualized on a continuum.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/Crystalizing-the-Role-One-Pager.pdf

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

 

One Pager:

Benefits of Native Traditional Healing

Authors: Alicia Evan

Publication Year: 2023

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Diabetes; Ethnicity; Hypertension; Injury and Trauma; Mental and Behavioral Health; Nutrition; Social Determinants of Health; Substance Use; Suicide and Suicide Prevention; Traditional Healing

 

Short Abstract: This infographic details five common traditional healing interventions offered at Urban Indian Organizations.

 

Abstract: This infographic details five common traditional healing interventions offered at Urban Indian Organizations. The information described is pulled from NCUIH’s report on “Recent Trends in Third-Party Billing at Urban Indian Organizations: Thematic Analysis of Traditional Healing Programs at Urban Indian Organizations and Meta-Analysis of Health Outcomes.” To learn more, view the whole report here. Disclaimer: The mentioned report associated with this infographic was commissioned by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) through a contract with NORC at the University of Chicago. This project supports evidence-based Medicaid reimbursement policymaking through rigorous research on the implementation and efficacy of traditional healing at Urban Indian Organizations. The views, opinions, and data analysis published in this report are those of the National Council of Urban Indian Health and do not reflect the policies or positions of the federal government.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/NCUIH-Traditional-Healing-Benefits-09.21.23-1.pdf

Type of Resource: Best Practices Newsletter

 

One Pager:

Effectiveness of traditional healers in treating mental disorders: a systematic review

Authors: Gareth Nortje, Bibilola Oladeji, Oye Gureje, Soraya Seedat

Publication Year: 2016

Journal: Lancet Psychiatry

Keywords: Mental and Behavioral Health

 

Short Abstract: Traditional healers form a major part of the mental health workforce worldwide. Despite this, little systematic examination has been done of their effectiveness in treating mental illness or alleviating psychological distress.

 

Abstract: Traditional healers form a major part of the mental health workforce worldwide. Despite this, little systematic examination has been done of their effectiveness in treating mental illness or alleviating psychological distress. In this review, we aim to fill this gap, with a focus on quantitative outcomes. We searched four databases and reference lists for papers that explicitly measured the effectiveness of traditional healers on mental illness and psychological distress. Eligible papers were assessed for quality, and outcomes and other details were extracted with the use of a standardised template. 32 eligible papers from 20 countries were included. The published literature on this topic is heterogeneous and studies are generally of poor quality, although some findings emerge more consistently. Some evidence suggests that traditional healers can provide an effective psychosocial intervention. Their interventions might help to relieve distress and improve mild symptoms in common mental disorders such as depression and anxiety. However, little evidence exists to suggest that they change the course of severe mental illnesses such as bipolar and psychotic disorders. Nevertheless, qualitative changes that are captured poorly by conventional rating scales might be as important as the quantitative changes reviewed here. We conclude by outlining the challenges involved in assessing the effectiveness of traditional healers.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/One-Pager-Effectiveness-of-Traditional-Healers.pdf

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

 

One Pager:

A Veterans’ Talking Circle: Urban Indian Peoplehood and Re-Indigenizing Places

Authors: Natalie Avalos

Publication Year: 2022

Journal: Material Religion

Keywords: Indigenous Sovereignty; Religious Traditions; Inter-Tribal Identity; Urban, Transnational Identity; Decolonization

 

Short Abstract: While the boundaries of Indigeneity as a category are generally contested in Indian country, urban spaces provide opportunities for affinity and multiple expressions of Indigenous identity to coexist and even thrive.

 

Abstract: While the boundaries of Indigeneity as a category are generally contested in Indian country, urban spaces provide opportunities for affinity and multiple expressions of Indigenous identity to coexist and even thrive. In Albuquerque, like many major cities, inter-tribal Indian identity centered on grassroots political activity increasingly recognizes Indigeneity as transnational and hemispheric, meaning that Indigenous peoples migrating from other parts of the Americas or around the world contribute to its greater Indigenous diversity (Ramirez 2007). Urban Indians in Albuquerque are composed of multiple peoples from diverse national and tribal identities, however, their points of convergence in the city, such as in ceremonial, sovereignty, and stewardship contexts enables a transnational expression of peoplehood to emerge. Indigenous sovereignty has been theorized as an articulation of peoplehood, defined by scholars as the persistence of a people who share a sacred history, religion, language, and land (Holm, Pearson, and Chavis 2003). In this article, I explore the ways urban Indian peoplehood emerges from the re-Indigenizing praxis of material life, such as talking circles, ceremony, and pottery-making, reflecting the generative culture making Native studies scholars call resurgence (Simpson 2011) and that moves away from essentialist and static definitions of Native identity that rely on blood quantum (Smith 2015).

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/17432200.2021.2015927

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

One Pager:

Understanding Disabilities in American Indian & Alaska Native Communities Toolkit Guide

Authors: National Indian Council on Aging, Inc. and National Council on Disability

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated:

Journal:

Keywords: Aging; Awareness; Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Diabetes; Health Care Access; Health Disparities; Medicare; Medicaid; Mental and Behavioral Health; Population Information; Substance Use; Visual Impairment; Disability; Historical Trauma

 

Short Abstract: This resource is divided into dedicated sections for healthy living, education, independent living, vocational rehabilitation and employment resources, assistive technology, housing and facilities, and transportation.

 

Abstract: This resource is divided into dedicated sections for healthy living, education, independent living, vocational rehabilitation and employment resources, assistive technology, housing and facilities, and transportation. Additional information provides overviews on federal disabilities laws, initiatives, agencies, and organizations that support work with Native individuals with disabilities and communities.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Funding:

Code:

Source: https://www.nicoa.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/03/NCD_Understanding_Disabilities_in_American_Indian_508.pdf

Type of Resource: Toolkit

A Cultural-Based approach to address substance use among urban Native American young adults

Authors: Melessa Kelley et al.

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: April 07, 2023

Journal: Journal of Community Psychology

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Substance Use; Cultural-Based Interventions; Young Adults; Talking Circles

 

Short Abstract: Native American young adults residing in urban communities are particularly vulnerable to substance use. After leaving high school, the pressures and stress of continuing education, finding employment, and the responsibilities related to family and tribal community obligations predispose these young adults to substance use.

 

Abstract: Native American young adults residing in urban communities are particularly vulnerable to substance use. After leaving high school, the pressures and stress of continuing education, finding employment, and the responsibilities related to family and tribal community obligations predispose these young adults to substance use. This study used a pre/post test design to evaluate a cultural-based Talking Circle intervention for the prevention of substance use among urban Native American young adults, ages 18–24. Three measures were used that included the Native-Reliance Questionnaire, the Indigenous-Global Assessment of Individual Needs (I-GAIN) Substance Use Scale, and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) measure for severity of depression. Findings revealed that participants demonstrated a higher sense of Native-Reliance, decrease in substance use, and a decrease in the PHQ-9 depressions scores from baseline to 6-month postintervention. These findings validate the importance of cultural-based interventions for the prevention of substance use among urban Native American young adults.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jcop.23044

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

One Pager:

Perspectives of Indigenous University Students in Canada on Mindfulness-Based Interventions and their Adaptation to Reduce Depression and Anxiety Symptoms

Authors: Shadi Beshai, Sharon M. Desjarlais & Brenda Green

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: February 21, 2023

Journal: Mindfulness

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Health Disparities; Mental and Behavioral Health; Psychology Suicide and Suicide Prevention; Youth; Anxiety; Depression; Mindfulness

 

Short Abstract: Objectives Indigenous university students experience high rates of anxiety and depression due primarily to the pernicious and persistent effects of colonialism, racism, and discrimination. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) hold promise, but likely require adaptation to make them culturally relevant for Indigenous peoples. We sought to gather Indigenous students’ perspectives on the consistency and adaptability of MBIs for Indigenous students experiencing symptoms of depression and anxiety.

 

Abstract: Objectives Indigenous university students experience high rates of anxiety and depression due primarily to the pernicious and persistent effects of colonialism, racism, and discrimination. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) hold promise, but likely require adaptation to make them culturally relevant for Indigenous peoples. We sought to gather Indigenous students’ perspectives on the consistency and adaptability of MBIs for Indigenous students experiencing symptoms of depression and anxiety. Method This three-part longitudinal investigation employed a qualitative design mixed with Indigenous research methods to elicit feedback from students (n = 14; Mage = 28.92) on the acceptability of MBIs and ways to tailor MBIs to make them more consistent with Indigenous cultures and student lifestyles. We subsequently used this feedback to develop an outline for an adapted MBI that was then re-evaluated by the same participants for its cultural relevance and safety. Results Indigenous students emphasized the need for the adapted MBI to incorporate (a) traditional Indigenous practices; (b) Indigenous facilitators; (c) holistic conceptualizations of mental health that include spirituality; and (d) practices and methods that could improve flexibility and accessibility of the adapted intervention. Based on this feedback, we presented students with an outline of an adapted MBI tentatively titled Miyowâyâwin Mindful Wellbeing Program, which received favorable evaluations by students for cultural consistency and safety. Conclusions We confirmed the perceived acceptability and consistency of mindfulness and mindfulness programs with Indigenous cultures. The need for a flexible MBI that centers Indigenous elements and Indigenous facilitators was highlighted by Indigenous participants. This study paves the way for latter steps of the development and subsequent evaluation of the Miyowâyâwin Mindful Wellbeing Program.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Funding:

Code:

Source: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12671-023-02087-7

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

The Culture is Prevention Project: Measuring Cultural Connectedness and Providing Evidence that Culture is a Social Determinant of Health for Native Americans

Authors: Paul Masotti, John Dennem, Karina Bañuelos, Cheyenne Seneca, Gloryanna Varlerio-Leonce, Christina Tlatilpa Inong, Janet King

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated:

Journal:

Keywords: Social Determinants of Health

 

Short Abstract: Background It is important for non-Native persons to understand that the meaning of culture to Native American/Indigenous Peoples is not about esteem, taste or music but rather is described as a cognitive map on how to be. Native American/Indigenous culture can be thought of as all the things and ways in which Native/Indigenous people understand who they are, where they come from and how they are to interact with others.

 

Abstract: Background It is important for non-Native persons to understand that the meaning of culture to Native American/Indigenous Peoples is not about esteem, taste or music but rather is described as a cognitive map on how to be. Native American/Indigenous culture can be thought of as all the things and ways in which Native/Indigenous people understand who they are, where they come from and how they are to interact with others. Hundreds of years across many generations have taught that culture-based activities and interventions improve Native/Indigenous health and wellbeing. We explore if increased Native American culture/cultural connectedness is associated with better mental health/well-being and physical health. Methods We analyzed data from a two-phased study (N = 259 and N = 102) of 361 urban Native Americans in California (2018–2021). The 29 items validated Cultural Connectedness Scale-California (CCS-CA) measured Native culture/cultural connectedness. Mental health/well-being and physical health were assessed using the: modified Herth Hope Index (mHHI), Satisfaction with Life (SWL), Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale-Revised (CESD-R-10), Substance Abuse (CAGE-AID), and Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL). We conducted Pearson correlations and stepwise regression analyses with CCS-CA as the independent (predictor) variable to explore our main research questions: 1) Is increased Native American/Indigenous culture associated with: 1) better mental health/well-being; and 2) better physical health? Results Increased Native/Indigenous culture (CCS-CA scores) is significantly associated with better mental health/well-being (mHHI, p < .001) and satisfaction with life (SWL, p < .001) predicts good physical health days (HRQOL, p < .001). Increased connection to Native American/Indigenous culture (CCS-CA scores) is significantly associated with decreased risk for depression (CESD-R-10, p < .0) and substance abuse and (CAGE-AID, p < .07). Significant results for culture as protective against risk for substance abuse (CAGE-AID) was most likely affected (p value approaching significance) due to an error in language on the measure (i.e., created double negative). Conclusions Native American/Indigenous culture is a predictor of improved outcomes for mental health/well-being and physical healthy days. Native culture is an important social determinant of health. We add to the evidence that Native/Indigenous culture (i.e., cultural connectedness) be considered an important intervention objective and health-related outcome measure.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Funding:

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Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC10120477/pdf/12889_2023_Article_15587.pdf

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Suffering like a Broken Toy: Social, Psychological, and Cultural Impacts for Urban American Indians with Chronic Pain

Authors: Elise AG Duwe

Publication Year: 2019

Last Updated:

Journal: International Journal of Indigenous Health

Keywords: Chronic Pain; Illness Experience; Invisibility; Psychological Peace; Warrior Strength

 

Short Abstract: This paper will explore the difficult conversations and places of tension in the lived experience of chronic pain for urban American Indians from a larger study discerning relationships between chronic pain and colonization.

 

Abstract: This paper will explore the difficult conversations and places of tension in the lived experience of chronic pain for urban American Indians from a larger study discerning relationships between chronic pain and colonization. A concurrent transformative mixed methods design with in-depth interviews and a survey was used for the larger study. This paper concerns only the qualitative data. Forty self-identified American Indian adults living in Indiana, Chicago, and Tulsa who reported pain for greater than three months provided their chronic pain illness experiences for this paper. The paper uses three data-derived themes to encompass the broad reaching social, psychological, and cultural suffering inherent in coping with chronic pain: invisibility, psychological peace, and warrior strength. American Indian chronic pain sufferers in this study struggle with the multiplicative invisibility of both their chronic pain and their native identity. The invisibility leads to passing as white in environments hostile to people of color. It also results in family disconnection, loneliness, and isolation. In order to survive socially-mediated assaults, American Indian chronic pain sufferers keep their psyche at peace through stress management, cultural engagement, and non-negativity. They also call upon warrior strength—their understanding that American Indians as peoples have always survived bolsters their individual strength to push through the pain. They seek to function without further debility and to maintain their economic, spiritual, social, and physical wellness. Ultimately the participants in this research tell a profound, critical, and world-changing story that requires attention in overcoming barriers to full thriving with chronic pain.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Funding:

Code:

Source: https://jps.library.utoronto.ca/index.php/ijih/article/view/31707/25292

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article