KRC Articles

Benefits of Native Traditional Healing

Authors: Alicia Evan

Publication Year: 2023

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Diabetes; Ethnicity; Hypertension; Injury and Trauma; Mental and Behavioral Health; Nutrition; Social Determinants of Health; Substance Use; Suicide and Suicide Prevention; Traditional Healing

 

Short Abstract: This infographic details five common traditional healing interventions offered at Urban Indian Organizations.

 

Abstract: This infographic details five common traditional healing interventions offered at Urban Indian Organizations. The information described is pulled from NCUIH’s report on “Recent Trends in Third-Party Billing at Urban Indian Organizations: Thematic Analysis of Traditional Healing Programs at Urban Indian Organizations and Meta-Analysis of Health Outcomes.” To learn more, view the whole report here. Disclaimer: The mentioned report associated with this infographic was commissioned by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) through a contract with NORC at the University of Chicago. This project supports evidence-based Medicaid reimbursement policymaking through rigorous research on the implementation and efficacy of traditional healing at Urban Indian Organizations. The views, opinions, and data analysis published in this report are those of the National Council of Urban Indian Health and do not reflect the policies or positions of the federal government.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/NCUIH-Traditional-Healing-Benefits-09.21.23-1.pdf

Type of Resource: Best Practices Newsletter

 

One Pager:

A Cultural-Based approach to address substance use among urban Native American young adults

Authors: Melessa Kelley et al.

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: April 07, 2023

Journal: Journal of Community Psychology

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Substance Use; Cultural-Based Interventions; Young Adults; Talking Circles

 

Short Abstract: Native American young adults residing in urban communities are particularly vulnerable to substance use. After leaving high school, the pressures and stress of continuing education, finding employment, and the responsibilities related to family and tribal community obligations predispose these young adults to substance use.

 

Abstract: Native American young adults residing in urban communities are particularly vulnerable to substance use. After leaving high school, the pressures and stress of continuing education, finding employment, and the responsibilities related to family and tribal community obligations predispose these young adults to substance use. This study used a pre/post test design to evaluate a cultural-based Talking Circle intervention for the prevention of substance use among urban Native American young adults, ages 18–24. Three measures were used that included the Native-Reliance Questionnaire, the Indigenous-Global Assessment of Individual Needs (I-GAIN) Substance Use Scale, and the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) measure for severity of depression. Findings revealed that participants demonstrated a higher sense of Native-Reliance, decrease in substance use, and a decrease in the PHQ-9 depressions scores from baseline to 6-month postintervention. These findings validate the importance of cultural-based interventions for the prevention of substance use among urban Native American young adults.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jcop.23044

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

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