KRC Articles

Causes and Disparities in Death Rates Among Urban American Indian and Alaska Native Populations, 1999–2009

Authors: Jasmine L. Jacobs-Wingo

Publication Year: 2016

Last Updated:

Journal: American Journal of Public Health

Keywords: Cancer; Data Collection; Diabetes; Health Disparities; Heart Disease; IHS; Injury and Trauma; Liver Disease; Misclassification of AI/AN; Population Information; Death Rates

 

Short Abstract: Objectives. To characterize the leading causes of death for the urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) population and compare with urban White and rural AI/AN populations.

 

Abstract: Objectives. To characterize the leading causes of death for the urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) population and compare with urban White and rural AI/AN populations. Methods. We linked Indian Health Service patient registration records with the National Death Index to reduce racial misclassification in death certificate data. We calculated age-adjusted urban AI/AN death rates for the period 1999–2009 and compared those with corresponding urban White and rural AI/AN death rates. Results. The top-5 leading causes of death among urban AI/AN persons were heart disease, cancer, unintentional injury, diabetes, and chronic liver disease and cirrhosis. Compared with urban White persons, urban AI/AN persons experienced significantly higher death rates for all top-5 leading causes. The largest disparities were for diabetes and chronic liver disease and cirrhosis. In general, urban and rural AI/AN persons had the same leading causes of death, although urban AI/AN persons had lower death rates for most conditions. Conclusions. Urban AI/AN persons experience significant disparities in death rates compared with their White counterparts. Public health and clinical interventions should target urban AI/AN persons to address behaviors and conditions contributing to health disparities.

 

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Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4985112/pdf/AJPH.2015.303033.pdf

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Development and evaluation of an enhanced diabetes prevention program with psychosocial support for urban American Indians and Alaska natives: A randomized controlled trial

Authors: Lisa G. Rosas et al.

Publication Year: 2016

Last Updated: September 2016

Journal: Contemporary Clinical Trials

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Diabetes; Nutrition; Population Information; Weight Management and Obesity; Prevention; Prediabetes; Community-based Participatory Research

 

Short Abstract: Diabetes is highly prevalent, affecting over 25 million adults in the US, yet it can be effectively prevented through lifestyle interventions, including the well-tested Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP).

 

Abstract: Diabetes is highly prevalent, affecting over 25 million adults in the US, yet it can be effectively prevented through lifestyle interventions, including the well-tested Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). American Indian/Alaska Native (AIAN) adults, the majority of whom live in urban settings, are more than twice as likely to develop diabetes as non-Hispanic whites. Additionally, prevalent mental health issues and psychosocial stressors may facilitate progression to diabetes and hinder successful implementation of lifestyle interventions for AIAN adults. This 2-phased study first engaged community stakeholders to develop culturally-tailored strategies to address mental health concerns and psychosocial stressors. Pilot testing (completed) refined those strategies that increase engagement in an enhanced DPP for urban AIAN adults. Second, the enhanced DPP will be compared to a standard DPP in a randomized controlled trial (ongoing) with a primary outcome of body mass index (BMI) and a secondary outcome of quality of life (QoL) over 12 months. Obese self-identified AIAN adults residing in an urban setting with one or more components of the metabolic syndrome (excluding waist circumference) will be randomized to the enhanced or standard DPP (n = 204). They hypothesized that addressing psychosocial barriers within a culturally-tailored DPP will result in clinical (BMI) and superior patient-centered (QoL) outcomes as compared to a standard DPP. Exploratory outcomes will include cardiometabolic risk factors (e.g., waist circumference, blood pressure, fasting glucose) and health behaviors (e.g., diet, physical activity). Results of this trial may be applicable to other urban AIAN or minority communities or even diabetes prevention in general.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

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Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6691492/pdf/nihms-1044257.pdf

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Standards of Care in Diabetes—2023 Abridged for Primary Care Providers

Authors: American Diabetes Association

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: February 16, 2023

Journal: American Diabetes Association

Keywords: Awareness; Diabetes; General Materials; Health Disparities; Health Care Reform; NCUIH Newsletters; Social Determinants of Health

 

Short Abstract: This abridged version of the current Standards of Care contains the evidence-based recommendations most pertinent to primary care. The recommendations, tables, and figures included here retain the same numbering used in the complete Standards of Care.

 

Abstract: This abridged version of the current Standards of Care contains the evidence-based recommendations most pertinent to primary care. The recommendations, tables, and figures included here retain the same numbering used in the complete Standards of Care. All recommendations included here are substantively the same as in the complete Standards of Care. The abridged version does not include references. The complete 2023 Standards of Care, including all supporting references, is available at professional. diabetes.org/standards.

 

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Source: https://diabetesjournals.org/clinical/article/doi/10.2337/cd23-er02a/148453/Erratum-Standards-of-Care-in-Diabetes-2023

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

A Diabetes Self-Management Program Designed for Urban American Indians

Authors: Sarah Castro et al.

Publication Year: 2009

Last Updated:

Journal: Preventing Chronic Disease: Public Health Research, Practice, and Policy

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Diabetes; Self-Management; Holistic

 

Short Abstract: Background: Although the American Indian population has a disproportionately high rate of type 2 diabetes, little has been written about culturally sensitive self-management programs in this population.

 

Abstract: Background: Although the American Indian population has a disproportionately high rate of type 2 diabetes, little has been written about culturally sensitive self-management programs in this population. Context: Community and clinic partners worked together to identify barriers to diabetes self-management and to provide activities and services as part of a holistic approach to diabetes self-management, called the Full Circle Diabetes Program. Methods: The program activities and services addressed 4 components of holistic health: body, spirit, mind, and emotion. Seven types of activities or services were available to help participants improve diabetes self-management; these included exercise classes, educational classes, and talking circles. Consequences: Ninety-eight percent of program enrollees participated in at least 1 activity, and two-thirds participated in 2 or more activities. Program participation resulted in a significant improvement in knowledge of resources for managing diabetes. Interpretation: The Full Circle Diabetes Program developed and implemented culturally relevant resources and supports for diabetes self-management in an American Indian population. Lessons learned included that a holistic approach to diabetes self-management, community participation, and stakeholder partnerships are needed for a successful program.

 

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Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2774645/pdf/PCD64A131.pdf

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Stopping Gestational Diabetes in American Indian and Alaska Native Girls: Nutrition as a Key Component to Gestational Diabetes Risk Reduction

Authors: Sarah A Stotz et al.

Publication Year: 2020

Last Updated: May 2020

Journal: Current Developments in Nutrition

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Diabetes; Health Disparities; Nutrition Weight Management and Obesity; Women's Health

 

Short Abstract: Background: American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women have a higher risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and subsequent diagnosis of diabetes than do non-Hispanic White women. Healthy eating is key to weight management both prior to pregnancy and between pregnancies and can reduce the risk of developing GDM. Our research team developed an innovative preconception counseling and diabetes risk-reduction program, which includes nutrition and weight-management principles and is culturally tailored for adolescent AI/AN women. The program is entitled Stopping Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (SGDM).

 

Abstract: Background: American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women have a higher risk of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and subsequent diagnosis of diabetes than do non-Hispanic White women. Healthy eating is key to weight management both prior to pregnancy and between pregnancies and can reduce the risk of developing GDM. Our research team developed an innovative preconception counseling and diabetes risk-reduction program, which includes nutrition and weight-management principles and is culturally tailored for adolescent AI/AN women. The program is entitled Stopping Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (SGDM). Objective: The purpose of this article is to examine nutrition-related information collected as a part of the formative qualitative research conducted for the development of a preconception counseling and gestational diabetes risk-reduction program, SGDM. Methods: This in-depth secondary analysis explored the original qualitative data from the needs assessment for SGDM program development. Participants included AI/AN women with a history of GDM (n = 5); AI/AN girls at risk of GDM (n = 14), and their mothers (n = 11), health care providers, and health administrators who care for AI/AN girls (n = 16); AI/AN elected leaders; and Indian health system administrators (n = 12). All focus groups and interviews were reanalyzed utilizing the following research question: “How do key stakeholders discuss food and/or nutrition in terms of gestational diabetes risk reduction for AI/AN adolescent girls?” Results: Three primary nutrition themes emerged: 1) AI/AN women were aware of healthy nutrition, healthy weight gain during pregnancy, and healthy nutrition for people with type 2 diabetes, but these principles were not linked to reducing the risk of GDM; 2) participants expressed the need for education on the role of nutrition and weight management in GDM risk reduction; 3) participants shared challenges of healthful eating during and before pregnancy for AI/AN women. Conclusions: These stakeholders’ comments informed the development of the nutrition components of SGDM.

 

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Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8242493/

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article