KRC Articles

Making Amends: Recommended Strategies and Actions to Improve the Health and Safety of American Indian and Alaska Native Mothers and Infants

Authors: U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Advisory Committee on Infant and Maternal Mortality (ACIMM)

Publication Year: 2022

Last Updated: December 2022

Journal:

Keywords: Awareness; Ethnicity; Federal Health Care; Health Care Access; Health Disparities; IHS; Infant Mortality; Medicare; Medicaid; Minority Groups; Misclassification of AI/AN; Pregnancy; Women's Health; Social Determinants of Health

 

Short Abstract: Report submitted in to US HHS Secretary with recommendations for the federal government to reconcile past actions and step up to the obligations to American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN). Recommendations are based on the findings of previous reports on the health of AI/AN people, populations, and communities, ACIMM’s analysis of maternal health and birth outcome-related data, presentations by representatives of federal health programs, and the testimony and input of over 88 individuals with relevant lived and professional experience.

 

Abstract: Report submitted in to US HHS Secretary with recommendations for the federal government to reconcile past actions and step up to the obligations to American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN). Recommendations are based on the findings of previous reports on the health of AI/AN people, populations, and communities, ACIMM’s analysis of maternal health and birth outcome-related data, presentations by representatives of federal health programs, and the testimony and input of over 88 individuals with relevant lived and professional experience. 59 strategies are offered to support three overarching recommendations: I. Make the health and safety of AI/AN mothers and infants a priority for action. II. Improve the living conditions of AI/AN mothers and infants and assure universal access to high quality healthcare III. Address urgent and immediate challenges that disproportionately affect AI/AN women before, during, and after pregnancy.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Funding:

Code:

Source: https://www.hrsa.gov/sites/default/files/hrsa/advisory-committees/infant-mortality/birth-outcomes-AI-AN-mothers-infants.pdf

Type of Resource: Report

Prevention in Our Native Communities Vol 3 Issue 1 Fall 2022

Authors: National American Indian and Alaska Native Prevention technology transfer center (PTTC) network

Publication Year: 2022

Last Updated: November 5, 2022

Keywords: Minority Groups; Suicide and Suicide Prevention; Social Determinants of Health

 

Short Abstract: This issue focuses on the negative impact stigma has on Natives in the early phases of the development of a substance use disorder. People in this situation could profit from early intervention but may feel embarrassed because of the stigma associated with substance use/abuse. The main article describes ways to ensure that culturally appropriate prevention efforts are both trauma-informed and non-stigmatizing.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://pttcnetwork.org/centers/national-american-indian-alaska-native-pttc/product/prevention-our-native-communities-vol-3

Type of Resource: Best Practices Newsletter

Resources Related to MMIP

Authors: NCUIH

Publication Year: 2022

Last Updated: November 30, 2022

Keywords: Awareness; General Materials; Injury and Trauma; Mental and Behavioral Health; Presentations; Suicide and Suicide Prevention; Violence; Social Determinants of Health; MMIP

 

Short Abstract: This is a document for resources related to the MMIP crisis, originally distributed during NCUIH's MMIP Virtual Dialogue on November 30, 2022. There are links to government databases, legislation trackers, 2 spirit talking circles, websites to report missing people, suicide hotlines specific for AI/AN, webinars on human trafficking, etc.

 

 

Source: Link to MMIP Related Resource Sheet.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/MMIP-Related-Resource-Sheet.pdf

 

Type of Resource: NCUIH data products

A Community-Based Evaluation of a Culturally Grounded, American Indian After-School Prevention Program: The Value of Practitioner-Researcher Collaboration

Authors: Brooke de Heer, Jade Heffern, Julianna Cheney, Aaron Secakuku, Julie Baldwin

Publication Year: 2020

Last Updated: September 2020

Journal: American Indian and Alaskan Native Mental Health Research

Keywords: Childcare; Mental and Behavioral Health

 

Short Abstract: Programs serving American Indian (AI) youth are an important component of maintaining cultural identity and healthy lifestyles. The current research took a community-engaged approach to evaluate an urban AI youth after-school program that has transitioned into a culturally grounded prevention program. Ways to create a successful research collaboration between AI communities and academics is discussed as well as implications for understanding the importance of culturally-grounded programs for AI youth who reside in urban areas. Overall, the cultural and health components that are integrated into the after-school program were highlighted as primary strengths because they help foster a healthy lifestyle and deeper connection to the heritage/culture for the youth who participated.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Understanding Sleep Facilitators, Barriers, and Cultural Dimensions in Native American Urban Youth

Authors: Alina Palimaru, PhD, MPP, Ryan Brown, PhD MA, Wendy Troxel, PhD MS, Daniel Dickerson, DO MPH, Carrie Johnson, PhD, Elizabeth D'Amico, PhD MA

Publication Year: 2020

Last Updated: August 2020

Journal: Sleep Health

Keywords: Childcare; Health Disparities; Mental and Behavioral Health; Sleep Health

 

Short Abstract: Background: AI/AN youth are a high-risk group for sleep problems and associated conditions. AI/AN youth are a high-risk group for sleep problems and associated chronic conditions. Urban AI/AN youth may face certain challenges, including specific psychosocial stressors (e.g., discrimination) and environmental factors (e.g., noise, light) that render them particularly vulnerable to poor sleep health. However, few studies have explored AI/AN adolescent sleep.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7529658/

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Traditional Food Practices, Attitudes, and Beliefs in Urban Alaska Native Women Receiving WIC Assistance

Authors: Amanda Walch, PhD, MPH, RDN, Philip Loring, PhD, Rhonda Johnson, PhD, Melissa Tholl, BS, RDN, Andrea Bersamin, PhD

Publication Year: 2019

Last Updated: March 2019

Journal: Journal of Nutritional Education Behavior

Keywords: Nutrition; Population Information; Traditional Diet; Traditional Foods; Food Sharing Networks

 

Short Abstract: Background: Traditional foods play an important cultural role in AI/AN populations and have been associated with psychological and psychosocial health and well-being. Low rates of traditional food intake have been reported to negatively impact food security, diet quality, and overall health. It is unknown to what extent urban Alaskan Native individuals consume traditional foods and the knowledge and attitudes they have about traditional foods.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8731265/

Racialization as a Barrier to Achieving Health Equity for Native Americans

Authors: Vikas Gampa, MD, Kenneth Bernard, MD, MBA, and Michael J. Oldani, PhD, MS

Publication Year: 2020

Last Updated: October 2020

Journal: AMA Journal of Ethics

Keywords: Race

 

Short Abstract: The concept of race has long been known to be complex. Especially within the American Indian/Alaskan Native populations. The concept of race itself has very European roots, and has had long lasting negative effects on the AI/AN population. Using this metric in medicine has proved to be rather controversial especially in terms of the AI/AN community, which is why this particular article highlights the concerns around using this method.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://journalofethics.ama-assn.org/article/racialization-barrier-achieving-health-equity-native-americans/2020-10