Photo-Based Evaluation: A Method for Participatory Evaluation With Adolescents

Authors: Deinera Exner-Cortens, Kathleen C. Sitter, Marisa Van Bavel, Alysia Wright

Publication Year: 2021

Last Updated: February 5, 2021

Journal: American Journal of Evaluation

Keywords: Awareness; Development; Gender Identity; Information Technologies; Social Determinants of Health; Health Promotion; Youth; Evaluation; Engagement; Gender; Healthy Relationships; WiseGuyz

 

Short Abstract: Actively engaging adolescents in meaningful program evaluation is a topic of growing interest. One possibility for such engagement is the use of photographs as part of visual evaluation, so that youth can directly engage with the research process. In this Method Note, we describe the development and implementation of a participatory, photo-based evaluation method for youth health promotion/prevention programs.

 

Abstract: Actively engaging adolescents in meaningful program evaluation is a topic of growing interest. One possibility for such engagement is the use of photographs as part of visual evaluation, so that youth can directly engage with the research process. In this Method Note, we describe the development and implementation of a participatory, photo-based evaluation method for youth health promotion/prevention programs. Youth in this study were participants in a gender-transformative healthy relationships program for boys. We present literature supporting the use of photographs as a visual research method and for involving youth as active participants in evaluation, and explore the feasibility, utility, and acceptability of this innovative application of existing methods based on researcher experience and youth feedback. We conclude with implications for photo-based evaluation of health promotion/prevention programs, highlighting the promise of this method for promoting critical youth engagement in the evaluation and creating meaningful knowledge translation tools. Photo-based evaluation could be a useful methodology for engaging AI/AN youth in research. More active engagement in the research process as well as having more control over the information the individual shares may help to alleviate some of the risks that are associated with being involved in research studies for AI/AN communities. Previous research mentioned in the article showed positive results when photo-voice was used with urban First Nations youth. (https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/24694193.2016.1273977).

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Funding:

Code:

Source: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1098214020927785

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Maternal Mortality Among American Indian/Alaska Native Women in Arizona

Authors: Arizona Department of Health Services

Publication Year: 2021

Last Updated: December 2021

Keywords: Infant Mortality; Pregnancy; Women's Health; Maternal Health

 

Short Abstract: This document is an overview of AI/AN maternal mortality and morbidity in Arizona with statistics from 2016-2018 Maternal Mortality Review Committee (MMRC) reviewed deaths in Arizona of women 15-49 years old with a pregnancy in the previous 365 days.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1XYFEeAQMkCURCWK7cI5xX-tSkrzKSsTX/view

Type of Resource: Fact sheets

Report on Maternal Mortality (2016-2017) and Severe Maternal Morbidity (2016-2019) in Arizona

Authors: Arizona Department of Health Services

Publication Year: 2020

Last Updated: December 2020

Keywords: Infant Mortality; Pregnancy; Women's Health; Maternal Health

 

Short Abstract: The findings in this report related to maternal mortality were derived from the CDC's Review to Action methods, which the Arizona Department of Health Services adopted in 2018. These methods differ from the methods used to review and report on maternal mortality in Arizona between 2012-2015. For this reason, maternal mortality findings between 2016-2017 should not be compared to findings reported in Arizona’s report on 2012-2015 maternal mortality, and instead, should be considered baseline data for future reporting.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Type of Resource: Other

Social Determinants of Mortality of COVID-19 and Opioid Overdose in American Rural and Urban Counties

Authors: Yuhui Zhu, PhD, Zhe Fei, PhD, Larissa J. Mooney, MD, Kaitlyn Huang, BS, and Yih-Ing Hser, PhD

Publication Year: 2022

Last Updated: January 2022

Journal: Journal of Addiction Medicine

Keywords: Covid-19; Health Disparities; Infection Disease; Social Determinants of Health; Substance Abuse

 

Short Abstract: After adjusting for other covariates, the overall mortality rate of COVID-19 is higher in counties with larger population size and a higher proportion of racial/ethnic minorities, although counties with high rates of opioid overdose mortality have lower proportions of racial/ethnic minorities, a higher proportion of females, and are more economically disadvantaged. Significant predictors of rural counties with high mortality rates for both COVID-19 and opioid overdose include higher ratios of Black people, American Indians and Alaska Native people, and people with two or more races. Additional predictors for high-risk urban counties include population density and higher unemployment rates during the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8815643/pdf/adm-16-e52.pdf

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Cancer disparities among non-Hispanic urban American Indian and Alaska Native populations in the United States, 1999-2017

Authors: Stephanie Melkonia, Melissa Jim, Dornell Pet, Amy Poel, Adrian Dominguez, Abigail Echo-Hawk, Stephanie Zhang, Reda Wilson, Donald Haverkamp, Lindsey Petras, Ashley Pohlenz

Publication Year: 2022

Last Updated: February 2022

Journal: Cancer

Keywords: Cancer; Health Disparities; Misclassification of AI/AN

 

Short Abstract: Background: Disparities in cancer incidence have not been described for urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations. The purpose of the present study was to examine incidence rates (2008-2017) and trends (1999-2017) for leading cancers in urban non-Hispanic AI/AN (NH AI/AN) compared to non-Hispanic White (NHW) populations living in the same urban areas.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://acsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/cncr.34122

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

National Indian Heath Board 51 State Health Insurance Status Report

Authors: National Indian Health Board

Publication Year: 2022

Last Updated: October 2022

Keywords: General Materials; Health Care Access; Health Disparities; Health Care Reform; Medicare; Medicaid; Insurance; Affordable Care Act; Social Determinants of Health

 

Short Abstract: This report from the National Indian Health Board details the enrollment of the AI/AN population in Medicare and Medicaid, as well as the AI/AN population that was uninsured between 2012-2020. This also offers a breakdown of this by each state and DC and the percent changes in enrollment over the 2012-2020 period. This report provides a view into the percent change in insurance enrollment of the AI/AN population before implementing the Affordable Care Act in 2013 and after.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://www.nihb.org/tribalhealthreform/wp-content/uploads/2022/11/NIHB-2022-State-Enrollment-Report-_FINAL.pdf

Type of Resource: NCUIH data products

US Trans Survey 2015, Report on the Experiences of American Indian and Alaska Native Respondents.

Authors: The National Center for Transgender Equality

Publication Year: 2016

Keywords: Awareness; Health Care Access; Health Disparities; Injury and Trauma; Mental and Behavioral Health; Minority Groups; Population Information; Presentations; Socio-Economic Disparities; Sexual Abuse; Suicide and Suicide Prevention; Violence; Social Determinants of Health; Gender Identity; LGBTQ/2S

 

Short Abstract: The 2015 US Trans Survey is a survey of trans and non-binary people across the country. This includes a separate report specifically on the American Indian and Alaskan Native respondents.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://transequality.org/sites/default/files/docs/usts/USTS-AIAN-Report-Dec17.pdf

Type of Resource: Other

NCUIH MMIP Fact Sheet

Authors: NCUIH

Publication Year: 2022

Last Updated: November 30, 2022

Keywords: Injury and Trauma; MMIP; General Materials; Mental and Behavioral Health; Domestic Violence; Social Determinants of Health; Violence

Short Abstract: This is a fact sheet with recent statistics on the issue of MMIP. It also addresses the different populations within the AI/AN community that the MMIP crisis can affect.

Source: Link to NCUIH MMIP Fact Sheet.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/NCUIH-MMIP-Fact-Sheet.pdf

Suicides Among American Indian or Alaska Native Persons — National Violent Death Reporting System, United States, 2015–2020

Authors: Deborah Stone, Eva Trinh, Hong Zhou, Laura Welder, Pamela End of Horn, Katherine Fowler, and Asha Ivey-Stephenson

Publication Year: 2022

Last Updated: September 16, 2022

Journal: CDC: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR)

Keywords: Injury and Trauma; Mental and Behavioral Health; Population Information; Suicide and Suicide Prevention; Violence

 

Short Abstract: A comparison of 2015–2020 suicides among all AI/AN and non-AI/AN decedents in 49 states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia found that AI/AN suicide decedents had higher adjusted odds of a range of relationship and alcohol or other substance use problems, and reduced odds of known mental health conditions and treatment than did non-AI/AN suicide decedents. Culturally relevant comprehensive public health approaches to suicide prevention are needed to address systemic and long-standing inequities among AI/AN persons.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/71/wr/mm7137a1.htm

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

A Community-Based Evaluation of a Culturally Grounded, American Indian After-School Prevention Program: The Value of Practitioner-Researcher Collaboration

Authors: Brooke de Heer, Jade Heffern, Julianna Cheney, Aaron Secakuku, Julie Baldwin

Publication Year: 2020

Last Updated: September 2020

Journal: American Indian and Alaskan Native Mental Health Research

Keywords: Childcare; Mental and Behavioral Health

 

Short Abstract: Programs serving American Indian (AI) youth are an important component of maintaining cultural identity and healthy lifestyles. The current research took a community-engaged approach to evaluate an urban AI youth after-school program that has transitioned into a culturally grounded prevention program. Ways to create a successful research collaboration between AI communities and academics is discussed as well as implications for understanding the importance of culturally-grounded programs for AI youth who reside in urban areas. Overall, the cultural and health components that are integrated into the after-school program were highlighted as primary strengths because they help foster a healthy lifestyle and deeper connection to the heritage/culture for the youth who participated.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article