Crystallizing the Role of Traditional Healing in an Urban Native American Health Center

Authors: Jacquelene F. Moghaddam, Sandra L. Momper, Timothy W. Fong

Publication Year: 2015

Journal: Community Mental Health Journal

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Data Collection

 

Short Abstract: A needs assessment surveying American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs) at an AI/AN health center in the Midwestern United States was conducted, with an emphasis on traditional Native healing. Data from this study included qualitative material from interviews of community members (N = 27; age 12–82) and service providers (N = 11; age 26–70).

 

Abstract: A needs assessment surveying American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs) at an AI/AN health center in the Midwestern United States was conducted, with an emphasis on traditional Native healing. Data from this study included qualitative material from interviews of community members (N = 27; age 12–82) and service providers (N = 11; age 26–70). Respondents emphasized the path to wellness includes physical, spiritual and mental health and that traditional healing can restore various imbalances. Furthermore, traditional healing was considered a complement to Western medicine. Third, traditional medicine as a tool in healthcare settings was conceptualized on a continuum.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/Crystalizing-the-Role-One-Pager.pdf

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

 

One Pager:

Benefits of Native Traditional Healing

Authors: Alicia Evan

Publication Year: 2023

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Diabetes; Ethnicity; Hypertension; Injury and Trauma; Mental and Behavioral Health; Nutrition; Social Determinants of Health; Substance Use; Suicide and Suicide Prevention; Traditional Healing

 

Short Abstract: This infographic details five common traditional healing interventions offered at Urban Indian Organizations.

 

Abstract: This infographic details five common traditional healing interventions offered at Urban Indian Organizations. The information described is pulled from NCUIH’s report on “Recent Trends in Third-Party Billing at Urban Indian Organizations: Thematic Analysis of Traditional Healing Programs at Urban Indian Organizations and Meta-Analysis of Health Outcomes.” To learn more, view the whole report here. Disclaimer: The mentioned report associated with this infographic was commissioned by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) through a contract with NORC at the University of Chicago. This project supports evidence-based Medicaid reimbursement policymaking through rigorous research on the implementation and efficacy of traditional healing at Urban Indian Organizations. The views, opinions, and data analysis published in this report are those of the National Council of Urban Indian Health and do not reflect the policies or positions of the federal government.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/NCUIH-Traditional-Healing-Benefits-09.21.23-1.pdf

Type of Resource: Best Practices Newsletter

 

One Pager:

The Relationship between Sextortion during COVID-19 and Pre-pandemic Intimate Partner Violence: A Large Study of Victimization among Diverse U.S Men and Women

Authors: Asia A. Eaton, Divya Ramjee, and Jessica F Saunders

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: January 30, 2023

Journal:

Keywords: Covid-19; Sexual Abuse; Violence

 

Short Abstract: In a large and diverse sample of U. S. adults, we assessed participants’ experience with pre-COVID in-person intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization and with sextortion victimization during COVID to better understand the relationship between these phenomena.

 

Abstract: In a large and diverse sample of U. S. adults, we assessed participants’ experience with pre-COVID in-person intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization and with sextortion victimization during COVID to better understand the relationship between these phenomena. Experiencing sexual IPV pre-COVID increased the likelihood that men and women would experience sextortion during COVID. Men, Black and Native women, LGBTQ individuals, and emerging adults more often experienced sextortion during COVID than other groups. Implications for research on technology-facilitated sexual violence and practice with survivors are explored.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Funding:

Code:

Source: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15564886.2021.2022057

Type of Resource: NCUIH data products

 

One Pager:

Report on Adult Vaccination Equity for Natives (RAVEN II) — June-August, 2023

Authors: Alexander Zeymo

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: August 31, 2023

Keywords: Vaccination; Immunization

 

Short Abstract: This is the second of a four-part summary about vaccine equity for American Indian and Alaska Native people, highlighting manuscripts and data published between June and August 2023.

 

Abstract: This is the second of a four-part summary about vaccine equity for American Indian and Alaska Native people, highlighting manuscripts and data published between June and August 2023. Throughout COVID-19 pandemic, the general population has paid higher attention to issues of health equity and vaccine equity. In addition to a concern that public health authorities and healthcare providers respond adequately to the seriousness of the pandemic, there was increased attention to existing perennial gaps in healthcare disparities and equity. The Native American community has been one such population; having long suffered from increased disease burden, stretched resources, and low trust in institutions that have historically failed them.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/RAVEN-II-Q2-Final.pdf

Type of Resource: NCUIH data products

 

One Pager:

COVID Vulnerability and Impact Summary for Urban Natives (VISUN) — April 2023

Email to Request Report: research@ncuih.org

Authors: Alexander Zeymo

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: June 12, 2023

Keywords: Covid-19; Infection Disease; Vaccination/Immunization

 

Short Abstract: This report is created using data that is publicly available and provided directly to the National Council for Urban Indian Health from the Office of Urban Indian Health. This report should be used for grant writing purposes and informative guidance for policy and advocacy about the status of COVID-19 and COVID-19 vaccination levels for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) people living in urban areas. If you would like to have access to this report, please send an email to research@ncuih.org. ***Please be aware, in section two, four counties were erroneously deleted from the analysis (07/12/2023).

 

Type of Resource: NCUIH data products

COVID Vulnerability and Impact Summary for Urban Natives (VISUN) — May 2023

Email to Request Report: research@ncuih.org

Authors: Alexander Zeymo

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: July 24, 2023

Keywords: Covid-19; Vaccination/Immunization

 

Short Abstract: This is a summary report compiled by NCUIH on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in the urban Native American community during the month of May 2023. This report highlights the level and severity of COVID-19 infections in UIO service areas, tracking recent trends in vaccinations, and reviewing recent news and research relevant to the urban AI/AN community. If you would like to have access to this report, please send an email to research@ncuih.org.

 

Type of Resource: NCUIH data products

Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences Among U.S. Adults — Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 2011–2020

Authors: Elizabeth A. Swedo, MD1; Maria V. Aslam, PhD2; Linda L. Dahlberg, PhD1; Phyllis Holditch Niolon, PhD1; Angie S. Guinn, MPH; Thomas R. Simon, PhD; James A. Mercy, PhD

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: June 30, 2023

Journal: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report

Keywords: Awareness; Health Disparities; Injury and Trauma; Mental and Behavioral Health; Population Information; Psychology; Social Determinants of Health; Socio-Economic Disparities; Sexual Abuse; Substance Use; Youth; Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)

 

Short Abstract: What is already known about this topic? Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with numerous negative outcomes. Previous data from 25 states indicated that ACEs are common among U.S. adults.

 

Abstract: What is already known about this topic? Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with numerous negative outcomes. Previous data from 25 states indicated that ACEs are common among U.S. adults. What is added by this report? Among U.S. adults from all 50 states and the District of Columbia surveyed during 2011–2020, approximately two thirds reported at least one ACE; one in six reported four or more ACEs. ACEs were highest among women, persons aged 25–34 years, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native adults, non-Hispanic multiracial adults, adults with less than a high school education, and adults who were unemployed or unable to work. Prevalence of individual and total number of ACEs varied across jurisdictions. What are the implications for public health practice? CDC’s Preventing Adverse Childhood Experiences: Leveraging the Best Available Evidence provides strategies for preventing and mitigating ACEs, particularly among disproportionately affected populations.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Funding:

Code:

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/72/wr/pdfs/mm7226a2-H.pdf

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Primary Psychiatric Diagnoses, Commercialized Tobacco Use, and Homelessness: Comparisons Between Urban American Indian/Alaska Native and Non-American Indian/Alaska Native Adult Clinical Samples

Authors: Daniel Dickerson et al.

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated:

Journal: American Indian and Alaska Native Mental Health Research

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Mental and Behavioral Health; Tobacco Use (non-traditional); Homelessness

 

Short Abstract: Although over 70% of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) reside in urban areas, our knowledge of urban AI/AN adults receiving mental health treatment is limited.

 

Abstract: Although over 70% of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) reside in urban areas, our knowledge of urban AI/AN adults receiving mental health treatment is limited. This study compares primary psychiatric diagnoses, commercialized tobacco use, and homelessness between AI/AN and non-AI/AN adults receiving services in an urban public mental health agency serving primarily AI/AN people in southern California. Depressive disorders were the most common psychiatric diagnoses for both groups. However, AI/AN adult clients demonstrated significantly less anxiety disorders and significantly more homelessness. Schizophrenia spectrum and other psychotic disorders, bipolar and related disorders, and commercialized tobacco use were higher among AI/AN adults compared to non-AI/AN adults. Results from this study offer data needed to further understand important public health issues that exist among AI/AN adults receiving mental health services in urban areas. We provide suggestions to enhance integrated and culturally appropriate treatment approaches and homelessness initiatives for this under-resourced, yet resilient population.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Funding:

Code:

Source: https://coloradosph.cuanschutz.edu/docs/librariesprovider205/journal_files/vol30/30_1_2023_14_dickerson.pdf

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Perspectives of Indigenous University Students in Canada on Mindfulness-Based Interventions and their Adaptation to Reduce Depression and Anxiety Symptoms

Authors: Shadi Beshai, Sharon M. Desjarlais & Brenda Green

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: February 21, 2023

Journal: Mindfulness

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Health Disparities; Mental and Behavioral Health; Psychology Suicide and Suicide Prevention; Youth; Anxiety; Depression; Mindfulness

 

Short Abstract: Objectives Indigenous university students experience high rates of anxiety and depression due primarily to the pernicious and persistent effects of colonialism, racism, and discrimination. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) hold promise, but likely require adaptation to make them culturally relevant for Indigenous peoples. We sought to gather Indigenous students’ perspectives on the consistency and adaptability of MBIs for Indigenous students experiencing symptoms of depression and anxiety.

 

Abstract: Objectives Indigenous university students experience high rates of anxiety and depression due primarily to the pernicious and persistent effects of colonialism, racism, and discrimination. Mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) hold promise, but likely require adaptation to make them culturally relevant for Indigenous peoples. We sought to gather Indigenous students’ perspectives on the consistency and adaptability of MBIs for Indigenous students experiencing symptoms of depression and anxiety. Method This three-part longitudinal investigation employed a qualitative design mixed with Indigenous research methods to elicit feedback from students (n = 14; Mage = 28.92) on the acceptability of MBIs and ways to tailor MBIs to make them more consistent with Indigenous cultures and student lifestyles. We subsequently used this feedback to develop an outline for an adapted MBI that was then re-evaluated by the same participants for its cultural relevance and safety. Results Indigenous students emphasized the need for the adapted MBI to incorporate (a) traditional Indigenous practices; (b) Indigenous facilitators; (c) holistic conceptualizations of mental health that include spirituality; and (d) practices and methods that could improve flexibility and accessibility of the adapted intervention. Based on this feedback, we presented students with an outline of an adapted MBI tentatively titled Miyowâyâwin Mindful Wellbeing Program, which received favorable evaluations by students for cultural consistency and safety. Conclusions We confirmed the perceived acceptability and consistency of mindfulness and mindfulness programs with Indigenous cultures. The need for a flexible MBI that centers Indigenous elements and Indigenous facilitators was highlighted by Indigenous participants. This study paves the way for latter steps of the development and subsequent evaluation of the Miyowâyâwin Mindful Wellbeing Program.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Funding:

Code:

Source: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12671-023-02087-7

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Report on Adult Vaccination Equity for Natives (RAVEN II) — March-May, 2023

Authors: Alexander Zeymo

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: May 6, 2023

Keywords: Vaccination/Immunization

 

Short Abstract: Throughout COVID-19 pandemic, the general population has paid higher attention to issues of health equity and vaccine equity. In addition to a concern that public health authorities and healthcare providers respond adequately to the seriousness of the pandemic, there was increased attention to existing perennial gaps in healthcare disparities and equity. The Native American community has been one such population; having long suffered from increased disease burden, stretched resources, and low trust in institutions that have historically failed them.

 

Abstract: Throughout COVID-19 pandemic, the general population has paid higher attention to issues of health equity and vaccine equity. In addition to a concern that public health authorities and healthcare providers respond adequately to the seriousness of the pandemic, there was increased attention to existing perennial gaps in healthcare disparities and equity. The Native American community has been one such population; having long suffered from increased disease burden, stretched resources, and low trust in institutions that have historically failed them. As the immediate response to COVID-19 is winding down, with the ending of the Emergency Declaration in May of 2023, attention should now be shifted to other adult vaccinations. With the same energy and concern that was paid to COVID-19 vaccinations, there should be increased attention to vaccine equity across all types of immunizations against preventable diseases. Therefore, NCUIH creates this report, to summarize the data around adult vaccines and immunizations in the urban Native American population. This report will show available data indicating a continued gap in vaccination coverage among AI/AN. This is the age where data defines the parameters of the story. With the story leading our action, having Native American and Urban Native American representation in data and research is essential to achieve vaccine equity.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source:

Type of Resource: NCUIH data products

 

Report: