Revenue Streams for Urban Indian Organizations

Authors: Isaiah O'Rear and Alexandra Payan

Publication Year: 2024

Last Updated: May 31, 2024

Keywords: Covid-19, Federal Health Care, Medicaid, Finance

 

Short Abstract: During the height of the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE), Congress passed a series of bipartisan relief bills that provided UIOs with additional monetary support.

 

Abstract: During the height of the COVID-19 public health emergency (PHE), Congress passed a series of bipartisan relief bills that provided UIOs with additional monetary support. These funding increases from COVID-19 relief allowed UIOs to advance existing programs, invest in infrastructure needs, establish mobile clinics, expand dental health care, hire more staff, and engage in additional outreach efforts. Despite the supplemental funding increases, UIOs remain chronically underfunded, still falling short of meeting the one-year funding amount needed and requested by the National Tribal Budget Formulation Workgroup.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/UIO-Survey-C19-Report-NCUIH-D494_F.pdf

Type of Resource: NCUIH data products

 

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American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) Disparities in Causes of Death, Life Expectancy, and Social Determinants of Health

Authors: Sophie Chishty

Publication Year: 2024

Keywords: Cancer; Covid-19; Data Collection; Diabetes; Ethnicity; Health Care Access; Health Disparities; Heart Disease; Infant Mortality; Infection Disease; Injury and Trauma; Liver Disease; Mental and Behavioral Health; Minority Groups; Population Information; Race; Social Determinants of Health; Socio-Economic Disparities; Suicide and Suicide Prevention; Violence

 

Short Abstract: The National Council of Urban Indian Health (NCUIH) has drafted an infographic summarizing American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) disparities in leading causes of death, life expectancy, and social determinants of health.

 

Type of Resource: NCUIH data products

 

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Racial and Ethnic Differences in Encounters Related to Suicidal Behavior Among Children and Adolescents With Medicaid Coverage During the COVID-19 Pandemic

Authors: Mir M. Ali, PhD1; Kristina D. West, MS, LLM1; Joel Dubenitz, PhD1; Pamela End of Horn, DSW2; David Paschane, PhD2; Sarah A. Lieff, PhD, MPH3

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: June 26, 2023

Keywords: Covid-19; Mental and Behavioral Health; Suicide and Suicide Prevention

 

Short Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic prompted a surge in mental health needs among adolescents and young adults,1 including an increase in suspected suicide attempts. 2 Before the pandemic, suicide was a major public health concern among youth. 3 The pandemic has also called attention to, and in some cases exacerbated, existing inequities in health care delivery, 4 but little is known about racial and ethnic differences in health care encounters related to suicidal behavior among children and adolescents during the pandemic.

 

Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic prompted a surge in mental health needs among adolescents and young adults,1 including an increase in suspected suicide attempts. 2 Before the pandemic, suicide was a major public health concern among youth. 3 The pandemic has also called attention to, and in some cases exacerbated, existing inequities in health care delivery, 4 but little is known about racial and ethnic differences in health care encounters related to suicidal behavior among children and adolescents during the pandemic. This is particularly true for American Indian or Alaska Native youth. American Indian and Alaska Native persons experienced higher suicide-related mortality compared to the general US population prior to the pandemic.5 We examined racial and ethnic differences in encounters related to suicidal behaviors among a national sample of children and adolescents covered under Medicaid or Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) during the first year of the pandemic.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/article-abstract/2806204

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

 

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Understanding and Healing Historical Trauma: The Perspectives of Native American Elders

Authors: Lisa Grayshield, Jeremy J. Rutherford, Sibella B. Salazar, et al.

Publication Year: 2015

Journal: Journal of Mental Health Counseling

Keywords: Injury and Trauma; Mental and Behavioral Health; healing; wellness; elders

 

Short Abstract: In this phenomenological study 11 Native American elders addressed three research questions: (a) the effect of historical trauma on self, family, and community; (h) how historical trauma currently affects Native people and their communities; and (c) what they would recommend that counselors and therapists do in addressing issues of historical trauma for Native and tribal people.

 

Abstract: In this phenomenological study 11 Native American elders addressed three research questions: (a) the effect of historical trauma on self, family, and community; (h) how historical trauma currently affects Native people and their communities; and (c) what they would recommend that counselors and therapists do in addressing issues of historical trauma for Native and tribal people. All participants spoke of historical trauma in terms of loss of tribal language and culture. They seemed to speak directly to Native people themselves as having the answers to healing and wellness for their own people; however, recommendations for nontribal people who work with Native people and communities were discussed.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/Understanding-and-Healing-2015-one-pager-formated.pdf

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

 

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Crystallizing the Role of Traditional Healing in an Urban Native American Health Center

Authors: Jacquelene F. Moghaddam, Sandra L. Momper, Timothy W. Fong

Publication Year: 2015

Journal: Community Mental Health Journal

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Data Collection

 

Short Abstract: A needs assessment surveying American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs) at an AI/AN health center in the Midwestern United States was conducted, with an emphasis on traditional Native healing. Data from this study included qualitative material from interviews of community members (N = 27; age 12–82) and service providers (N = 11; age 26–70).

 

Abstract: A needs assessment surveying American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIs/ANs) at an AI/AN health center in the Midwestern United States was conducted, with an emphasis on traditional Native healing. Data from this study included qualitative material from interviews of community members (N = 27; age 12–82) and service providers (N = 11; age 26–70). Respondents emphasized the path to wellness includes physical, spiritual and mental health and that traditional healing can restore various imbalances. Furthermore, traditional healing was considered a complement to Western medicine. Third, traditional medicine as a tool in healthcare settings was conceptualized on a continuum.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/Crystalizing-the-Role-One-Pager.pdf

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

 

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Benefits of Native Traditional Healing

Authors: Alicia Evan

Publication Year: 2023

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Diabetes; Ethnicity; Hypertension; Injury and Trauma; Mental and Behavioral Health; Nutrition; Social Determinants of Health; Substance Use; Suicide and Suicide Prevention; Traditional Healing

 

Short Abstract: This infographic details five common traditional healing interventions offered at Urban Indian Organizations.

 

Abstract: This infographic details five common traditional healing interventions offered at Urban Indian Organizations. The information described is pulled from NCUIH’s report on “Recent Trends in Third-Party Billing at Urban Indian Organizations: Thematic Analysis of Traditional Healing Programs at Urban Indian Organizations and Meta-Analysis of Health Outcomes.” To learn more, view the whole report here. Disclaimer: The mentioned report associated with this infographic was commissioned by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) through a contract with NORC at the University of Chicago. This project supports evidence-based Medicaid reimbursement policymaking through rigorous research on the implementation and efficacy of traditional healing at Urban Indian Organizations. The views, opinions, and data analysis published in this report are those of the National Council of Urban Indian Health and do not reflect the policies or positions of the federal government.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/NCUIH-Traditional-Healing-Benefits-09.21.23-1.pdf

Type of Resource: Best Practices Newsletter

 

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‘Women are supposed to be the leaders’: intersections of gender, race, and colonisation in HIV prevention with Indigenous young people

Authors: Vanessa Oliver et al.

Publication Year: 2015

Journal: Culture, Health & Sexuality

Keywords: Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Gender Identity; Health Disparities; HIV/AIDS; Race; Sexuality; Women's Health; Youth; Erasure; Colonialism

 

Short Abstract: Focusing on gender, race and colonialism, this paper foregrounds the voices of Indigenous young people, their histories of oppression, their legacies of resistance and the continuing strengths rooted in Indigenous peoples, their cultures and their communities.

 

Abstract: Focusing on gender, race and colonialism, this paper foregrounds the voices of Indigenous young people, their histories of oppression, their legacies of resistance and the continuing strengths rooted in Indigenous peoples, their cultures and their communities. Exploring the relationship between gender and colonialism, the paper speaks to the lived realities of young people from Indigenous communities across Canada. Over 85 young people participated in six different Indigenous community workshops to create artistic pieces that explored the connections between HIV, individual risk and structural inequalities. In the course of the research, Indigenous young people, and young Indigenous women in particular, talked about how gender intersects with race and colonisation to create experiences that are, at times, especially difficult for them. In this paper, young people discuss the ways in which colonialism has demeaned women’s roles and degraded women’s sexuality, and how continuing cultural erasure and assimilationist policies impact on their lives and on their bodies.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/Women-are-Supposed-to-be-the-leaders-One-Pager.pdf

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

 

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Effectiveness of traditional healers in treating mental disorders: a systematic review

Authors: Gareth Nortje, Bibilola Oladeji, Oye Gureje, Soraya Seedat

Publication Year: 2016

Journal: Lancet Psychiatry

Keywords: Mental and Behavioral Health

 

Short Abstract: Traditional healers form a major part of the mental health workforce worldwide. Despite this, little systematic examination has been done of their effectiveness in treating mental illness or alleviating psychological distress.

 

Abstract: Traditional healers form a major part of the mental health workforce worldwide. Despite this, little systematic examination has been done of their effectiveness in treating mental illness or alleviating psychological distress. In this review, we aim to fill this gap, with a focus on quantitative outcomes. We searched four databases and reference lists for papers that explicitly measured the effectiveness of traditional healers on mental illness and psychological distress. Eligible papers were assessed for quality, and outcomes and other details were extracted with the use of a standardised template. 32 eligible papers from 20 countries were included. The published literature on this topic is heterogeneous and studies are generally of poor quality, although some findings emerge more consistently. Some evidence suggests that traditional healers can provide an effective psychosocial intervention. Their interventions might help to relieve distress and improve mild symptoms in common mental disorders such as depression and anxiety. However, little evidence exists to suggest that they change the course of severe mental illnesses such as bipolar and psychotic disorders. Nevertheless, qualitative changes that are captured poorly by conventional rating scales might be as important as the quantitative changes reviewed here. We conclude by outlining the challenges involved in assessing the effectiveness of traditional healers.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/One-Pager-Effectiveness-of-Traditional-Healers.pdf

Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

 

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The Relationship between Sextortion during COVID-19 and Pre-pandemic Intimate Partner Violence: A Large Study of Victimization among Diverse U.S Men and Women

Authors: Asia A. Eaton, Divya Ramjee, and Jessica F Saunders

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: January 30, 2023

Journal:

Keywords: Covid-19; Sexual Abuse; Violence

 

Short Abstract: In a large and diverse sample of U. S. adults, we assessed participants’ experience with pre-COVID in-person intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization and with sextortion victimization during COVID to better understand the relationship between these phenomena.

 

Abstract: In a large and diverse sample of U. S. adults, we assessed participants’ experience with pre-COVID in-person intimate partner violence (IPV) victimization and with sextortion victimization during COVID to better understand the relationship between these phenomena. Experiencing sexual IPV pre-COVID increased the likelihood that men and women would experience sextortion during COVID. Men, Black and Native women, LGBTQ individuals, and emerging adults more often experienced sextortion during COVID than other groups. Implications for research on technology-facilitated sexual violence and practice with survivors are explored.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Funding:

Code:

Source: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/15564886.2021.2022057

Type of Resource: NCUIH data products

 

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Report on Adult Vaccination Equity for Natives (RAVEN II) — June-August, 2023

Authors: Alexander Zeymo

Publication Year: 2023

Last Updated: August 31, 2023

Keywords: Vaccination; Immunization

 

Short Abstract: This is the second of a four-part summary about vaccine equity for American Indian and Alaska Native people, highlighting manuscripts and data published between June and August 2023.

 

Abstract: This is the second of a four-part summary about vaccine equity for American Indian and Alaska Native people, highlighting manuscripts and data published between June and August 2023. Throughout COVID-19 pandemic, the general population has paid higher attention to issues of health equity and vaccine equity. In addition to a concern that public health authorities and healthcare providers respond adequately to the seriousness of the pandemic, there was increased attention to existing perennial gaps in healthcare disparities and equity. The Native American community has been one such population; having long suffered from increased disease burden, stretched resources, and low trust in institutions that have historically failed them.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

Source: https://ncuih.org/wp-content/uploads/RAVEN-II-Q2-Final.pdf

Type of Resource: NCUIH data products

 

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