In-Hospital Mortality Disparities Among American Indian and Alaska Native, Black, and White Patients with COVID-19

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Report to Congress on Leveraging Federal Programs to Prevent and Control Diabetes and Its Complications

Authors: National Clinical Care Commission 

Publication Year: 2021 

Last Updated: 2021 

Journal: Health.gov 

Keywords: Diabetes 

Abstract:

The National Clinical Care Commission, a federal advisory committee established by the National Clinical Care Commission Act of 2017 – PDF, recently released its final report outlining recommendations to improve diabetes awareness, prevention, and treatment. The report called for additional federal efforts to improve access to health care, address social determinants of health, and improve trans-agency collaboration.

Specifically, NCCC recommends supporting funding for SDPI, including Funding for the Special Diabetes Program for Indians (SDPI) in five-year increments so that evidenced-based tribal diabetes prevention programs have the resources to (1) sustain the effort to combat diabetes and its complications; (2) develop additional culturally appropriate, high-impact diabetes prevention interventions; and (3) evaluate outcomes. • An increase in SDPI funding to address inflation costs, which have consumed more than 34% of the program’s resources since 2004, the last year Congress increased funding for the Special Diabetes Program. In the future, annual increases in funding should, at a minimum, address the costs of inflation.

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Psychological and Social Support Associations with Mortality and Cardiovascular Disease in Middle-Aged American Indians: the Strong Heart Study

Authors: Astrid Suchy-Dicey, Harry Eyituoyo, Marcia O’Leary, Shelley A. Cole, Aminata Traore, Steve Verney, Barbara Howard, Spero Manson, Dedra Buchwald & Paul Whitney  

Publication Year: 2022 

Last Updated: 2022 

Journal: Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology  

Keywords: Aging; Minority Groups 

Abstract: Researchers at the University of Washington in conjunction with The Strong Heart Family Study, examine the effect that social support and community have on cardiovascular and mortality disparities in older/middle-aged American Indians. Topics studied include; stress, anger, cynicism, trauma, depression, quality of life, and social support.

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Disparities in Cancer Incidence and Trends Among American Indians and Alaska Natives in the United States, 2010–2015

Authors: Stephanie C. Melkonian, Melissa A. Jim, Donald Haverkamp, Charles L. Wiggins, Jeffrey McCollum, Mary C. White, Judith S. Kaur, and David K. Espey 

Publication Year: October 2019 

Last Updated:  

Journal: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention 

Keywords: Cancer, Health Disparities 

Abstract: Background: Cancer incidence rates for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations vary by geographic region in the United States. The purpose of this study is to examine cancer incidence rates and trends in the AI/AN population compared with the non-Hispanic white population in the United States for the years 2010 to 2015. Methods: Cases diagnosed during 2010 to 2015 were identified from population-based cancer registries and linked with the Indian Health Service (IHS) patient registration databases to describe cancer incidence rates in non-Hispanic AI/AN persons compared with non-Hispanic whites (whites) living in IHS purchased/referred care delivery area counties. Age-adjusted rates were calculated for the 15 most common cancer sites, expressed per 100,000 per year. Incidence rates are presented overall as well as by region. Trends were estimated using joinpoint regression analyses. Results: Lung and colorectal cancer incidence rates were nearly 20% to 2.5 times higher in AI/AN males and nearly 20% to nearly 3 times higher in AI/AN females compared with whites in the Northern Plains, Southern Plains, Pacific Coast, and Alaska. Cancers of the liver, kidney, and stomach were significantly higher in the AI/AN compared with the white population in all regions. We observed more significant decreases in cancer incidence rates in the white population compared with the AI/AN population. Conclusions: Findings demonstrate the importance of examining cancer disparities between AI/AN and white populations. Disparities have widened for lung, female breast, and liver cancers. Impact: These findings highlight opportunities for targeted public health interventions to reduce AI/AN cancer incidence. 

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Report on Adult Vaccination Equity for Natives (RAVEN) — February 2022

Authors: Alek Zeymo 

Publication Year: 2022 

Last Updated:  

Journal: NCUIH 

Keywords: Covid-19 Infection, Disease, Vaccination 

Short Abstract: This report is created using data that is publicly available and provided directly to the National Council for Urban Indian Health from the Office of Urban Indian Health. This report should be used for grant writing purposes and informative guidance for policy and advocacy about the status of COVID-19 and other adult vaccination levels and equity for AI/AN people living in urban areas. Do not disseminate without permission from the National Council for Urban Indian Health. 

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Mortality Profile of the Non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native Population, 2019

Authors: Elizabeth Arias, Ph.D., Jiaquan Xu, M.D., Sally Curtin, M.A., Brigham Bastian, B.S., and Betzaida Tejada-Vera, M.S., Division of Vital Statistics

Publication Year: 2021

Last Updated: November 9, 2021

Journal: National Vital Statistics Reports

Keywords: Awareness; Covid-19; Data Collection; Health Disparities

Abstract: Due to the lack of adequate data and research on the mortality rates of the American Indian/Alaska Native population, researchers for this report took initiative and complied the death rates for the U.S. non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native (AIAN) population for 2019. The data for the (AI/AN) population is compared amongst non-Hispanic white, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic populations. The data used to create this study is from the final mortality data for 2019, July 1, 2019, the 2010 decennial census; the 2018 and 2019 linked birth/infant death data files; and a data set consisting of 2010 decennial census AIAN records linked to mortality data.

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Disaggregating Data to Measure Racial Disparities in COVID-19 Outcomes and Guide Community Response — Hawaii, March 1, 2020–February 28, 2021

Authors: Joshua J. Quint, PhD1, Miriam E. Van Dyke, PhD, Hailey Maeda, MPH J. Keʻalohilani Worthington, MPH, May Rose Dela Cruz, Dr. Joseph Keaweʻaimoku Kaholokula, PhD, Chantelle Eseta Matagi, Catherine M. Pirkle, PhD, Emily K. Roberson, PhD, Tetine Sentell, PhD, Lisa Watkins-Victorino, PhD, Courtni A. Andrews, MPH, Katherine E. Center, PhD, Renee M. Calanan, PhD, Kristie E.N. Clarke, MD, Delight E. Satter, MPH, Ana Penman-Aguilar, PhD, Erin M. Parker, PhD, Sarah Kemble, MD

Publication Year: 2021

Last Updated: September 17, 2021

Journal: Centers for Disease Control & Prevention: MMWR

Keywords: Awareness, Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness, Data Collection, Health Disparities

Abstract: Research shows that Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander populations have been disproportionately affected by COVID-19. Despite being distinctly different groups and populations, data from these populations is often grouped together in analyses. This unfortunately can limit the understanding of disparities among diverse groups such as Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, and Asian subpopulations. That is why, in order to assess disparities in COVID-19 outcomes among Native Hawaiian, Pacific Islander, and Asian populations an all inclusive study of all population groups was done using 21,005 COVID-19 cases and 449 COVID-19–associated deaths reported to the Hawaii State Department of Health (HDOH) during March 1, 2020–February 28, 2021.

Source: https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7037a1.htm?s_cid=mm7037a1_w

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Report on Adult Vaccination Equity for Natives (RAVEN) — December 2021

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Missing or Murdered Indigenous Women: New Efforts Are Underway but Opportunities Exist to Improve the Federal Response

Authors: Government Accountability Office
Publication Year: 2021
Last Updated: Oct 28, 2021
Journal: Government Accountability Office
Keywords: Awareness; Data Collection; Development; Minority Groups; Race; Violence; Women's Health

Short Abstract: Research has proven that AI/AN women in the U.S. experience higher rates of violence than most other women. Due to this, tribal and federal officials have stated that this incidence of violence constitutes a crisis. Due to lack of an adequate response/data, GAO was asked to review the federal response to the missing or murdered AI/AN women crisis. This report examines the not only the numbers of missing and murdered AI/AN women, but also the DOD and DOJ's response thus far.

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