Keeping Us Whole: Preventing Missing and Murdered Indigenous People – Podcast Series

Authors: US Dept. of Health and Human Services: Administration for Native Americans

Publication Year: 2022

Last Updated: April 26, 2022

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Keywords: Awareness; Childcare; Injury and Trauma; NCUIH Newsletters; Population Information; Violence

 

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Abstract: For generations, American Indian, Alaskan Native and Native Hawaiian peoples have faced an ongoing crisis of violence, human trafficking, and an epidemic of Missing and Murdered Indigenous People (also known as MMIP). To bolster prevention efforts to mitigate the MMIP epidemic, the Administration for Native Americans (ANA), a program office within the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), collaborated with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Secretary’s Interdepartmental Council on Native American Affairs (ICNAA) to develop a podcast series to raise awareness, provide prevention resources and educate listeners on MMIP. This 10-part podcast series includes interviews with a variety of speakers, from tribal leadership to federal partners, advocates, members of grassroots organizations and native athletes that have all joined together to raise awareness of the MMIP epidemic. This series identifies ways we can focus on prevention and the continued work of Keeping Us Whole.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

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Source: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/ana/podcast/keeping-us-whole-preventing-missing-and-murdered-indigenous-people-podcast-series

Type of Resource: Podcast Series

A Community-Based Evaluation of a Culturally Grounded, American Indian After-School Prevention Program: The Value of Practitioner-Researcher Collaboration

Authors: Brooke de Heer, Jade Heffern, Julianna Cheney, Aaron Secakuku, Julie Baldwin

Publication Year: 2020

Last Updated: September 2020

Journal: American Indian and Alaskan Native Mental Health Research

Keywords: Childcare; Mental and Behavioral Health

 

Short Abstract:

 

Abstract: Programs serving American Indian (AI) youth are an important component of maintaining cultural identity and healthy lifestyles. The current research took a community-engaged approach to evaluate an urban AI youth after-school program that has transitioned into a culturally grounded prevention program. Ways to create a successful research collaboration between AI communities and academics is discussed as well as implications for understanding the importance of culturally-grounded programs for AI youth who reside in urban areas. Overall, the cultural and health components that are integrated into the after-school program were highlighted as primary strengths because they help foster a healthy lifestyle and deeper connection to the heritage/culture for the youth who participated.

 

Source: Link to Original Article.

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Type of Resource: Peer-reviewed scientific article

Loved Here, Safe Here, Social Marketing Campaign

Authors: Author: Adolescent Health Team at the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board (NPAIHB)

Publication Year: 2022

Last Updated:

Journal: Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board (NPAIHB)

Keywords: Awareness; Childcare; Cultural Sensitivity and Appropriateness; Development; Minority Groups; Sexuality

 

Short Abstract: Due to STI Awareness Week being April 10-16, 2022, the Adolescent Health Team at the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board (NPAIHB) has created a resource guide filled with health promotion materials for tribal clinics. This guide is also meant to be a source for those who work with Native Youth, to support them in creating a safe space for the 2SLGBTQ+ community. Hence the name, "Love Here, Safe Here," a collaboration with AI/AN LGBTQ and Two Spirit community members. All resource materials are attached in the folder provided.

 

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Source: Link to Original Article.

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Source: https://www.npaihb.org/social-marketing-campaigns/